first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Advertisement Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites TAGSachievementhealthLimerick City and CountyMaternity HospitalNewsUMHL Linkedin WhatsApp NewsHealthAnna is University Maternity Hospital Limerick’s first midwife sonographerBy Staff Reporter – June 18, 2019 2860 Twitter Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students center_img Email Previous articlePodcast: Taking burlesque to the ‘Wild Atlantic Cabaret’ #WeAreLimerickNext articleMetal shows roll into town and Limerick has a party Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Facebook Limerick on Covid watch list pictured at the University Maternity Hospital Limerick (UMHL) as it celebrated International Day of the Midwife to highlight the vital role these professionals play in the health of mothers, newborns and their families.Pic. Brian ArthurANNA Gleeson has become the first midwife-sonographer to practise at University Maternity Hospital Limerick (UMHL).Healthcare professionals providing antenatal ultrasounds have traditionally come from a radiography background but a shortage of sonographers nationally has seen practitioners start to enter through the midwifery route.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Ms Gleeson has 30 years’ experience as a midwife and has recently obtained an MSc in Ultrasonography from University College Dublin. Her qualification is a positive development for women accessing maternity care in the MidWest. Anna was supported in her training and supervised by radiographer colleagues in UMHL and the Department of Radiology at University Hospital Limerick.pictured at the University Maternity Hospital Limerick (UMHL) as it celebrated International Day of the Midwife to highlight the vital role these professionals play in the health of mothers, newborns and their families.Pic. Brian Arthur“I was always interested in ultrasound and, in fact, I had done a short course on it in the UK in the past. Nothing came of that but when the opportunity came up and the hospital sought expressions of interest for a Masters in Ultrasound, I gave it serious consideration,” explained Ms Gleeson, from Kilteely, County Limerick.“When you work in a hospital, you are always going on courses to maintain and improve your skills but an 18-month commitment up to masters level is of a different order. I have five children to look after but everyone at home and at work was very supportive and I decided I would take that opportunity. It was a big commitment as it involved travelling to UCD two days every fortnight for one and half years; and a lot of study and assignments in between!”“To be honest, I was something of a matriarch in my group, which was made up of midwives and radiographers in the main. My interest, because of my background, was obviously in obstetrics and gynaecology but there were others doing the course because they wished to pursue their own interest in soft tissue or in circulation, where ultrasound also has a role.”Obstetric ultrasound services are internationally recognised as essential in providing good antenatal care. It is through ultrasound that pregnancies can be accurately dated, the gender of the baby identified and any anomalies picked up. The role of ultrasound in improving mental health in pregnancy, in providing reassurance and in strengthening the bond with baby is also recognised.Healthcare professionals who provide ultrasound imaging services need to be highly educated and highly skilled to practise and manage their caseloads in an era where pregnancies are more complex; the average age of mothers is increasing; diabetes in pregnancy is on the rise and there are more multiple births due to IVF and other factors.“The clarity of the image is vital and while the theory is all well and good, the important thing is learning a new skill so you can master the imaging techniques. A woman going in for her scan will see the sonographers making it look easy but that only comes with a lot of training; and hand-eye co-ordination is very important,” explained Ms Gleeson.These practical skills were mainly acquired locally, working with the radiographer sonographers and fetal medicine specialists in UMHL. She also spent some time in the National Maternity Hospital in Holles Street and in the Rotunda Hospital. Ms Gleeson works in both the main ultrasound department and in the Early Pregnancy Assessment Unit at UMHL. The role, she said, is very varied.“It is a special job to be there at such a happy time for women as their pregnancy is being confirmed and they themselves can see the first real pictures of their baby.  Equally, it can be a sad or difficult time especially when miscarriage is diagnosed. The way ultrasound technology has developed and improved over the years, we are more likely to pick up  deviations from the norm and, in that way, we can help mothers and their partners by referring them on to the right service and the right people, whether that be foetal medicine or cardiac services and so on. And they are therefore better prepared for follow-on care after the birth of their baby. It also helps labour ward staff plan the birth to ensure the specialties needed for the baby are present at the birth thus ensuring the best possible outcome.”Margaret Quigley, Director of Midwifery, UL Hospitals Group, commented: “We are delighted that Anna has been successful in her masters which gives her the qualification to perform prenatal ultrasounds.  She is the first midwife to work in our ultrasound department and we are very grateful for all the support she has received in the unit. We have a plan for another midwife to start the journey that Anna set out on 18 months ago and to continue to support this as a career choice into the future.” TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Print Local backlash over Aer Lingus threatlast_img read more


first_imgFormer champion tennis player Mark Kratzmann talks about his dream home and why he loves living in Maroochydore.Former Australian professional tennis player Mark Kratzmann has won 18 double titles and his best slam performance in singles was reaching the fourth round of the 1987 Australian Open. Kratzmann achieved a career-high singles ranking of World No. 50 in March 1990.He shares why he loves living on the Sunshine Coast. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoFormer tennis player Mark Kratzmann in action. Picture: Jamie Hanson. DREAM QUEENSLAND HOME Picnic Point Esplanade, Maroochydore. For all the above reasons however this quiet cul-de-sac is one of the very few on the whole Sunshine Coast that doesn’t get any road noise or through traffic.There is a boat ramp 100m away so it is easy and fast to be in the river enjoying the coastal lifestyle. Probably on Sydney Harbour looking at the bridge and Opera House. And Geneva Switzerland. Bradman Ave, Maroochydore. Three bedroom unit for $118,000 in 1992.I wanted property on the river in Maroochydore so I could paddle board and fish and at that point Bradman Ave was fairly quiet.Now I would never live there as the traffic noise has greatly increased.center_img I am living in it.Although this is currently a double story house, we are moving to the Penthouse of The Ivy apartments just up the road on Picnic Point Esplanade in a year.No gardens to tend, and all the luxuries o top floor living on the river. FIRST HOME F ANTASY HOME CURRENT HOMElast_img read more


first_img 10 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img Share Clico policyholders will get another day in court on February 1.PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad and Tobago, Thursday January 12, 2012 – Yesterday (December 11) a group of CLICO policyholders went again before the court to challenge government’s refusal to pay them the full amount due on their Executive Flexible Premium Annuities (EFPA). When the United Policyholders Group and four other applicants went before the Port-of-Spain High Court yesterday, they were granted a judicial review application to challenging the state’s refusal to act on a promise to pay CLICO EFPA holders’ their full sum is expected to be heard on February 1.The policyholders, represented by attorney Ramesh Lawrence Maharaj and Peter Knob, QC, had prior to the court hearing held a meeting at Centre Pointe Mall in Chaguanas, in which Maharaj had said he was optimistic that ruling will be made in the policyholders’ favour.They were seeking an interim court order that Government give details of the assets of CLICO which has been sold and how the proceeds of the sales were applied. Maharaj said the lawsuit also sought to compel Government to give details of the EFPA policyholders who have been paid in full since January 2009.Maharaj said he hoped the matter should be resolved by March. “The EFPA policyholders are very upbeat. They want to get their full compensation but they have indicated if the government decides to enter into discussions to resolve the matter, they are prepared to give and take so the government can get some concessions from the EFPA policyholders.”The matter was heard in the Hall of Justice, Port of Spain, where Justice Joan Charles, who is presiding over the matter, ordered that all submissions be filed by January 27. Queen’s Counsel Allan Newman has been retained to appear on behalf of the Government alongside, Deborah Peake, SC, and Kelvin RamkissoonCaribbean 360 News NewsRegional CLICO policyholders challenging TT government for EFPA pay by: – January 12, 2012last_img read more


first_imgIrishman Daniel Martin recorded the biggest win of his career to date as a late attack carried him to victory in the Liege-Bastogne-Liege classic. “I cannot believe it. I am really in shock,” said Martin on cyclingnews.com. “The team rode like I’ve never seen them ride before. They protected me all day. We had Ryder (Hesjedal) and me, two guys in the last group. I am so happy. I just cannot believe it.” Martin’s team-mate Ryder Hesjedal – who helped Martin to fourth place in La Fleche Wallonne earlier in the week – played a major role in the victory, helping bring the race under control on the penultimate climb of the 261.5km route as several teams tried to line up attacks. Team Sky had led the peloton as they chased down a group of early escapees but a series of attacks followed and in the end they finished no better than Sergio Henao’s 16th place, David Lopez unable to make a late attack hold. Press Associationcenter_img The Garmin-Sharp rider pulled alongside Katusha’s Joaquim Rodriguez with a kilometre to go before kicking for victory, leaving the Spaniard to come home second, three seconds back, ahead of compatriot Alejandro Valverde of Movistar. The 26-year-old Martin, who demonstrated his form with victory in the Tour of Catalonia last month, becomes only the second Irishman to win this coveted title, one of cycling’s five ‘Monuments’, after Sean Kelly triumphed in 1984 and 1989. last_img read more