first_img “Being a small community and with a great liberal arts coordination, I was able to take a lot of social sciences that my colleagues weren’t able to take,” he said. “Your inner ear is in tune with gravity. You are made for this planet, and when you leave it, it is confusing for your head and your eyes,” Ford said. Ford said experiencing a new view of earth was one of the most memorable experiences of his 2009 trip to the International Space Station, which lasted almost fourteen days. “The coolest parts are that you have a view of the planet out of the window, and the zero gravity,” he said. “Almost everything you do, gravity is somehow involved. Just doing little things involved a little forethought.” “I knew I wanted to fly when I was 13 or 14. I wanted to be an Air Force pilot and maybe be an airline pilot down the road,” he said. “I took flight lessons when I was 16, and worked at a grocery store to pay for it, so that should tell you how much I wanted it.” Prior to his time at NASA, Ford was a member of the Air Force for 18 years — something he said was a near lifelong dream. Ford, who is scheduled to return to the International Space Station in October of 2012, said he believes the drive to succeed is what enabled him to achieve his dreams, and is the key to success for Notre Dame students. Ford said it takes years to train to be certified as a flight-ready astronaut. Once he was assigned to his flight, he had a little over a year to train with his team. Ford says it took him a while to be accepted into the astronaut-training program, which he began in August of 2000. He said though zero gravity was an entertaining aspect of his time aboard the space staion, it did present its challenges to the human body, especially in terms of acclimating to the new conditions.center_img Though they were just about to be launched into space, the flight crew sitting in the cockpit of the space shuttle Discovery was not too nervous just prior to their Aug. 28, 2009 launch, according to astronaut Kevin Ford. “I applied three times before I was accepted. I still have the rejection letters at home,” he said. While at Notre Dame, Ford was a member of the Air Force ROTC and lived in Morrissey Manor. He said that Notre Dame prepared him in ways for his career and training that no other school could. “Quite frankly, I don’t think anyone in our cockpit was nervous. If you are nervous about anything, it’s about throwing the correct switch at the right time,” he said. “After being on the launch pad for three hours in a space suit, it is nice to be launched into space.” Ford, a 1982 graduate of Notre Dame with a degree in aerospace engineering, participated in the flag presentation ceremony prior to this weekend’s football game between Notre Dame and Stanford. “A big part of training is astronaut candidate training, which lasts about a year and a half to two years. You get some hands on and leadership training,” he said. “They also teach you some technical training that you will need to fly a space shuttle. After completing this you are assignable to a space flight.” He also said Notre Dame’s course requirements helped make him a stronger student by forcing him to take classes he normally would not take, which has paid off in his career as an astronaut. “It’s a special place to get a good feel for other people’s point of view. The fact that Notre Dame has this real diverse attitude provides well,” he said. “Patience is required in training, and you are essentially a student for something that has risk associated with it.” “Consider your life and educational experiences. If you have a dream or goal, persistence is a virtue. Don’t be afraid to get out there,” he said.last_img read more


first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image JAMESTOWN – A Jamestown man is facing charges after allegedly throwing a pocket knife at a child’s face during an incident Monday night.Jamestown Police say Robert Trenary, 26, was arrested after police responded to a disorderly person call on Fulton Street around 9:30 p.m.While inside a residence, it is alleged that Trenary recklessly threw a knife striking a minor in the face.Police say Trenary was taken into custody without incident. Trenary is charged with third-degree assault, second-degree reckless endangerment and endangering the welfare of a child.Additionally, officers say Trenary had an outstanding domestic violence arrest warrant.last_img read more


first_imgBy Clint Waltzand GilLandryUniversity of GeorgiaWarm-season turf grasses such as Bermuda, centipede, zoysia andSt. Augustine suffer some common problems with springtimegreen-up. Here are the ones we see most often.Mowing height is the most commonproblem as these grasses go from dormancy to active growth.Scalping is more common in zoysia grasses, especially in thedenser-growth cultivars like Emerald.Zoysia grasses don’t tolerate scalping as Bermuda will. As arule, zoysia will be set back anytime it’s cut low enough thatyou can see the black mold under the leaf canopy. This isgenerally below the node of the growing leaves. It can occur atany mowing height from as low as 0.5 inches to more than 3 inches.Regardless of the grass species and normal mowing height, takingthe grass down below the node will set it back. Generally, thehigher the mowing height, the more this is a problem.Ideally, maintain Bermuda grass and centipede between 1 and 2inches, zoysia from 0.5 to 2 inches and St. Augustine from 2 to 3inches.Mowing frequency is just as important as mowing height. If youremove more than one-third of the leaf height at a single mowing,the grass will be stressed.Fertility requirements differ witheach grass. Consult your county University of Georgia ExtensionService agent or visit www.GeorgiaTurf.com for fertilityrecommendations.No matter what the species, though, fertilizing too early in theseason, before soils are warm enough to support continual growth,can accelerate green-up but cause detrimental long-term effects.Fertilizing these grasses in late-winter or early spring cancause them to break dormancy. Then when the inevitablelate-season cold snap hits, they’ve used their stored foodreserves. They have no energy to withstand environmentalextremes. To avoid this, don’t fertilize until the soil reaches65 degrees.Thatch, as lawns get older,becomes more problematic, particularly if the turf has been mowedabove its recommended height ranges. Increased thatch slows downthe turf’s spring transition. It makes it more susceptible todisease, too.Water — either too much or toolittle or even a combination of the two — can cause problemsfor grasses, especially zoysia.Diseases can strike during springgreen-up. The most common is Rhizoctonia large patch, whichappears as large areas of blighted grass.This disease is most active when night temperatures are between50 and 60 degrees. When conditions are right, it’s common for thedisease to become active first in the fall and then again in thespring.You can see its typical “halo” when the disease is active. Falland spring fungicide applications can control it. Consult yourcounty UGA Extension agent for proper fungicides and rates.Applying nitrogen just before or during active infection willincrease disease problems.Cool temperatures make centipedeand zoysia slower to green up in the spring.Microclimates can cause problems,too. Emerald zoysia growing north of Atlanta has been killed bythe low temperatures in shaded sites that don’t get much wintersun.Varietal differences can betroublesome. Some incidences suggest that many types of Emeraldzoysia exist in the landscape and green up at different rates.Cooperative research with the Georgia Crop ImprovementAssociation and Auburn University is under way to evaluate thesegrass differences.(Clint Waltz is an Extension Service turf scientist and GilLandry the director of the Georgia Center for Urban Agriculturewith the University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.) Volume XXIXNumber 1Page 29last_img read more


first_imgBEIJING, China: A year ago, he couldn’t walk. Yesterday, Fedrick Dacres ended the qualification round in the men’s discus at the IAAF World Championships at the Bird Nest in Beijing, China, as the number-one qualifier heading into the final. It’s a remarkable turnaround and one that takes sharper focus when the most optimistic of outlooks did not consider that the promising thrower would be able to compete here in Beijing, with Dacres and his team targeting a return to form next season ahead of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Dacres suffered damage to the meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in his left knee and was forced to spend the better part of six months on the sidelines after surgery, with little hope of getting in shape in time for the World Championships. It was a tough period for the sociology student at the University of West Indies, who admitted to considering packing it all up and focusing on his studies when he was struggling with injuries. “When I did the surgery, I could not even walk. I thought I was a bright kid so I could find my way back to the book so I decided to be a scholar. I started healing and then I just stayed working towards recovering. If I couldn’t work my legs, I focused on the upper body and told myself that if my knees never come back 100 per cent, I can strengthen my upper body and become a thrower who relies on arm strength,” said Dacres. “This wasn’t in our plan. This was a supposed to be a year to prep for Rio. So to be here in good condition and maybe vying for a medal is a good feeling,” he added. “I’m not really a good starter, I can’t start well. So for me to come out here and get a big start like that, which got me into the final is a great feeling and I want to build on that now,” Dacres told The Gleaner. his impressive start Buoyed by his impressive start to his World Championships experience, Dacres, a champion at the World Youth and World Junior levels, said he is focusing on executing the instructions of his coach Julian Robinson. “I believe that this year it’s about who wants it more because no one is way ahead or dominating in this event, so I’m just here and I’m trying to make the best of it,” he added. “Mr Robinson is a guru, he does things differently, but it’s also all about trusting the big man. I’m a soldier, so I follow orders it has got me to a 65m opener and if I open with that, I feel I can do so much more.” The men’s discus final will take place tomorrow at 6:50 a.m. – A.L.last_img read more