first_imgFour percent of the president’s leadership council at Notre Dame are people of color, compared to 30 percent of the student body while just 28 percent of the University’s Board of Trustees are women, compared to 49 percent of the student body.These statistics were among several others presented to the student affairs committee of the Board of Trustees last week.These statistics were presented by members of the 2017-18 student body leadership as part of their spring semester report to the Board on Thursday.In the fall, the Board chooses the student body leadership’s report topic. Last fall, the Board selected the topic of campus alcohol culture. In the spring, the students get to choose the topic, this year they chose to focus on people of color and people of low socioeconomic status in University and student leadership.“They’re always really fascinated by what is going on and what we pinpoint as student issues,” student body president emeritus and senior Becca Blais said.Chief of staff emeritus and junior Prathm Juneja said the students drew upon their own experiences at Notre Dame to pick the topic.“You have two women in the room, two people of color in the room [and] people of low socioeconomic status in the room,” Juneja said. “We’re just like, these are some of the barriers that we had to face, and we were lucky enough to overcome some of them, but not everyone else gets that opportunity.”The day before giving the report, student body vice president emeritus and senior Sibonay Shewit said she had high expectations for the report’s reception.“I think the conversation will be really positive,” Shewit said. “Once it’s in front of you, you acknowledge it and you work towards progress. I can’t imagine a situation where they would deny that this is something that needs to be worked on.”The report looks at the representation of women and minorities in leadership roles among students — for example, in hall staff — and among University leadership, in groups such as the Board of Trustees and the Board of Fellows.Juneja said there were no RA‘s of color in his dorm his freshman year, which impacted his ability to feel completely welcome.“The experiences I had in O’Neill, at least early on, were ones of microaggressions. Even my sophomore year, I had a decently serious hate crime happen against me,” Juneja said.  “Those are things that made feel really apart from Notre Dame, and had I had representation in my dorm, I think I would have had mentors.”The report offers several solutions for lack of representation. Aside from making a greater effort to place minorities in leadership roles, the University could offer monetary gifts to allow students of low socioeconomic status to participate in student government and be RAs, Juneja said.“Students of low socioeconomic status have no incentive to be RAs because their financial aid often already covers room and board,” Juneja said. “As a result, there aren’t representative leaders in the dorm for students who come in with issues like that.”The report also asks for student union talentship grants, which will allow students of low socioeconomic status to work in student government without sacrificing the income that an on-campus job would provide.Blais and Shewit said they found that a lack of female representation in University leadership inhibited their ability to find mentors.“I did intentionally seek out women mentorship at the University, specifically in administration, and found it very challenging,” Blais said. “It means a lot when you can see a leading woman and identify with her and have someone to look up to.”Because of stipulations for the Board of Fellows, six of the 12 members of the Board must be Holy Cross priests, according to the website. The University president must also be a Holy Cross priest, restricting the role to men.“I would love to see a woman in charge of this university one day, more than anything,” Blais said. “But, if that cannot be possible, then I would at least like to see women in the second-hand position … and in more positions on the Board of Fellows.”Shewit, as a woman and a person of color, said both of these identities have impacted her experience at Notre Dame.“You see time and time again, when they do these inclusion surveys, there’s almost a correlation between minority students and not feeling as welcome in the community,” Shewit said.Because of the few poor experiences Juneja had in his dorm community, he does not always know what to advise prospective students of color, he said.“I’m not sure that Notre Dame is the perfect place for me, but I’m happy with the person it’s making me,” Juneja said. “It’s not an easy task for people of color to come to this University … but by no means is it a bad decision. It’s just a challenging one.”The results from the Board report might not be visible for several years, Juneja said. However, increased diversity in hiring over the next few years could show the impact of the report.Shewit said the University must be proactive in taking steps to make sure all students feel welcome.“Even if it doesn’t really seem like so many tangible things … I can’t stress enough how important it is that students, faculty members, alums, Board members, administrators, continue to talk about representation and the minority experience,” Shewit said.Tags: blais-shewit, Board of Trustees, board report, Diversity, representation, Student governmentlast_img read more


first_imgHealthLifestyle Cosmetic surgeons call for surgery adverts ban by: – January 23, 2012 Share Sharing is caring! Share The PIP implants were made with low-grade silicone not meant for medical useCosmetic surgery advertising should be banned and annual checks carried out on surgeons, the industry has said.The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (Baaps) wants measures including increased regulation of the “cowboy” market in the UK.Prof Sir Bruce Keogh is leading a government review of the trade after the PIP breast implants scandal.Sir Bruce has said an insurance scheme for the sector, similar to that in the travel industry, could be introduced.‘Marketing gimmicks’The government is also considering the introduction of a breast implant registry to make a record of all cosmetic operations.Baaps said cosmetic surgery as a medical procedure should not be advertised, in the same way that the promotion of prescription medicines is banned.Baaps president Fazel Fatah said: “Over the last decade the Baaps has worked tirelessly to educate the public on the many aggressive marketing gimmicks that not only trivialise surgery but endanger the patient.“We have warned against the unrealistic expectations set by reality ‘makeover’ shows and against crass competition prizes promising ‘mummy makeovers’ and body overhauls.“In no other area of surgery would one encounter Christmas vouchers and two-for-one offers – the pendulum has swung too far, and it is time for change.“Thus we are delighted with the upcoming inquiry and put forward our realistic and achievable proposals for consideration by the government.”‘Patient welfare’The Independent Healthcare Advisory Services represents the cosmetic surgery industry.Its director Sally Taber told the BBC that “this type of advertising has increased to an inapproprate level”. However, she added: “We do not agree that there should be a total ban on cosmetic surgery advertising.“Advertising should be honest and ethical, in everybody’s interests so the patient is aware of what is available.“We have worked hard with Baaps to ensure there isn’t this incentivised advertising.”The faulty implants were made by the now-closed French company Poly Implant Prostheses (PIP) and filled with industrial rather than medical grade silicone.Some 300,000 of the implants were sold around the world, mainly in Europe.About 40,000 women in the UK received PIP implants, with 95% dealt with by private clinics.The government has said implants given on the NHS can be removed and replaced free of charge, and removed but not replaced if it was done privately.Private clinics have varied in their response to whether they will remove the implants for free.NHS medical director Sir Bruce said: “I am working with experts from the plastic surgery field to look at what we can do to make sure people who choose to have cosmetic surgery and other cosmetic procedures are safe.“I will be looking at all aspects of regulation, at the regulation of implants and fillers, at whether the people who carry out cosmetic interventions have the right skills, at whether the clinics look after the care and welfare of their patients.”BBC Newscenter_img 13 Views   no discussions Tweet Sharelast_img read more


first_imgCoaches Corner with Hall of Famer Ron Raver will be on Monday Night at 6 on The Sports Voice-Country 103.9 WRBI and WRBIRADIO.Com.Guests include Brad Stacy-Franklin County Girls Basketball Coach and Eric Heppner-Batesville Football Coach and his Assistants.IU Exhibition Basketball will follow immediately after Coaches Corner.last_img