first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR First Irish death from Coronavirus Linkedin NewsHealthLimerick to benefit from air ambulance serviceBy Editor – November 11, 2016 1076 Facebook Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Twitter Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Previous articleGAA – Two Limerick sides remainNext articleThe Lions Barber Collective goes Stateside with #barbertalk Editor John Kearney (left), co-founder of Irish Community Air Ambulance with medical and flight crew at Cork Airport.Photo: Michael Mac SweeneyA new initiative that has the ability to save countless lives in its first 12 months of service has been announced.Based out of Cork Airport and serving Limerick and the main towns in Munster, Irish Community Air Ambulance will provide a vital lifesaving service , offering fast access to advanced clinical interventions at the roadside by highly trained pre-hospital emergency care physicians.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Irish Community Air Ambulance service will mirror successful models across the United Kingdom and other countries where geographically challenging terrain warrants an air ambulance.It is hoped that more than €1 million can be raised to launch the service from late Spring 2017. Irish Community Air Ambulance will complement the existing emergency services and the current Athlone based Emergency Aeromedical Service operated by the National Ambulance Service in partnership with the Irish Air Corps.It has been proven that early access to world class critical care and pre hospital emergency medicine administered by trained, experienced and equipped medical personnel can save lives. The air ambulance service will offer gold standard care commencing at the roadside and continuing while on route to definitive care in hospital.Co-founder John Kearney said “People are dying unnecessarily due to the time it takes to receive critical care.  This service will be built on the already successful model of Ireland’s Rapid Response Service which has been in existence since 2009 and uses volunteer doctors for pre-hospital emergencies.“There are currently five level four clinicians and more than 100 GPs with the Rapid Response Service who have saved countless lives and improved care in its seven years. The launch of a community air ambulance service is the next step bringing better response times with permanent on-duty doctors who will have the ability to bring advanced skills to acutely ill and injured people throughout its catchment area,” Mr Kearney explained.“It will offer a mobile intensive care unit by air which will allow us to safely transport patients faster to a major hospital, saving time and lives. This is a service for Munster so we need the support of the people of Munster to donate, fundraise or volunteer.“We need to raise € 1million to take off and € 2million every year thereafter which is a huge ask but in our view achievable.  Communities in Cork have sustained our land based Rapid Response doctors, now we’re calling on the people of Limerick and  the rest of Munster to support an Air Ambulance. Just €2 per person per year in our Province will do it!”, he said. The air ambulance will travel to every town in Munster over the next six months in a bid to raise much needed funds. People are being encouraged to log on to www.communityairambulance.ie to pledge or host community fundraising events to get lift-off.By texting the word “FLIGHT” to 50300 people can easily pledge €4 to the cause.center_img Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL TAGSCork AirportfeaturedhelicopterIrish Air CorpsIrish community air ambulanceJohn KearneylimerickNational Ambulance Service Print No vaccines in Limerick yet Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Advertisement Email WhatsApplast_img read more


first_img“LEFT JAB AND RIGHT JAB” FOOTNOTE: Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.,“Right Jab And Left Jab” was created because we have two commenters that post on a daily basis either in our “IS IT TRUE” or “Readers Forum” columns concerning National or International issues.Joe Biden and Ronald Reagan’s comments are mostly about issues of national interest.  The majority of our “IS IT TRUE” columns are about local or state issues, so we have decided to give Mr. Biden and Mr. Reagan exclusive access to our newly created “LEFT JAB and RIGHT JAB”  column. They now have this post to exclusively discuss national or world issues that they feel passionate about.We shall be posting the “LEFT JAB” AND “RIGHT JAB” several times a week.  Oh, “Left Jab” is a liberal view and the “Right Jab is representative of the more conservative views. Also, any reader who would like to react to the written comments of the two gentlemen is free to do so. FOOTNOTE: Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers. “Right Jab And Left Jab” was created because we have two commenters that post on a daily basis either in our “IS IT TRUE” or “Readers Forum” columns concerning National or International issues.Joe Biden and Ronald Reagan’s comments are mostly about issues of national interest.  The majority of our “IS IT TRUE” columns are about local or state issues, so we have decided to give Mr. Biden and Mr. Reagan exclusive access to our newly created “LEFT JAB and RIGHT JAB”  column. They now have this post to exclusively discuss national or world issues that they feel passionate about.We shall be posting the “LEFT JAB” AND “RIGHT JAB” several times a week.  Oh, “Left Jab” is a liberal view and the “Right Jab is representative of the more conservative views. Also, any reader who would like to react to the written comments of the two gentlemen is free to do so.center_img FOOTNOTE: Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.,“Right Jab And Left Jab” was created because we have two commenters that post on a daily basis either in our “IS IT TRUE” or “Readers Forum” columns concerning National or International issues.Joe Biden and Ronald Reagan’s comments are mostly about issues of national interest.  The majority of our “IS IT TRUE” columns are about local or state issues, so we have decided to give Mr. Biden and Mr. Reagan exclusive access to our newly created “LEFT JAB and RIGHT JAB”  column. They now have this post to exclusively discuss national or world issues that they feel passionate about.We shall be posting the “LEFT JAB” AND “RIGHT JAB” several times a week.  Oh, “Left Jab” is a liberal view and the “Right Jab is representative of the more conservative views. Also, any reader who would like to react to the written comments of the two gentlemen is free to do so.,“Right Jab And Left Jab” was created because we have two commenters that post on a daily basis either in our “IS IT TRUE” or “Readers Forum” columns concerning National or International issues.Joe Biden and Ronald Reagan’s comments are mostly about issues of national interest.  The majority of our “IS IT TRUE” columns are about local or state issues, so we have decided to give Mr. Biden and Mr. Reagan exclusive access to our newly created “LEFT JAB and RIGHT JAB”  column. They now have this post to exclusively discuss national or world issues that they feel passionate about.We shall be posting the “LEFT JAB” AND “RIGHT JAB” several times a week.  Oh, “Left Jab” is a liberal view and the “Right Jab is representative of the more conservative views. Also, any reader who would like to react to the written comments of the two gentlemen is free to do so. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare,“Right Jab And Left Jab” was created because we have two commenters that post on a daily basis either in our “IS IT TRUE” or “Readers Forum” columns concerning National or International issues.Joe Biden and Ronald Reagan’s comments are mostly about issues of national interest.  The majority of our “IS IT TRUE” columns are about local or state issues, so we have decided to give Mr. Biden and Mr. Reagan exclusive access to our newly created “LEFT JAB and RIGHT JAB”  column. They now have this post to exclusively discuss national or world issues that they feel passionate about.We shall be posting the “LEFT JAB” AND “RIGHT JAB” several times a week.  Oh, “Left Jab” is a liberal view and the “Right Jab is representative of the more conservative views. Also, any reader who would like to react to the written comments of the two gentlemen is free to do so.last_img read more


first_imgIn January, a Minnesota court sentenced a National Guardsman to a year in jail after the pickup he was driving killed a mother of two. She had been riding her bicycle, towing her 4-year-old and 1-year-old daughters behind her. He had been processing a bank transaction on his cellphone.That same month, a Pennsylvania woman was sentenced to two weeks in county prison for hitting a pedestrian, whom she hadn’t seen because she was reading a text message. The impact fractured the pedestrian’s face and collarbone. According to a media report, the case was one of three that day in the same court that sent young mothers to jail for distracted driving.Society is slowly awakening to the problem of distracted driving, but still is not taking it seriously enough, according to Jay Winsten, associate dean for health communication and Frank Stanton Director of the Center for Health Communication at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Winsten and the center spearheaded the U.S. designated-driver campaign of the late 1980s and early 1990s, which took hold amid growing public opposition to drinking and driving, and which helped to change social norms around the behavior. Winsten has identified distracted driving as a significant public health problem and a center priority. He is working to understand it, to make it less acceptable through a similar change in social norms, and to craft how to communicate public health messages more effectively in today’s fragmented media market.The Gazette spoke with Winsten, who last week briefed members of the Massachusetts House on the situation and some possible solutions.GAZETTE: Can you tell us about the event at the State House last week, and what the main message was?WINSTEN: The event was hosted by Rep. Cory Atkins, who has introduced legislation to ban the use of handheld devices when behind the wheel. The event was organized by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Health Communication to provide a briefing for members of the state Legislature and their staffs. We had about 60 people in attendance.Our point of departure was the fact that the current law, a ban on texting while driving that’s in place in Massachusetts and in most other states, is almost impossible to effectively enforce. All a driver has to do is roll down the window and say, “Officer, I was looking up a phone number, not texting.” It’s not illegal to look up a phone number. It’s not illegal to dial the number by hand on your cellphone. It’s not illegal to program your GPS on your cellphone. It’s not illegal to even watch videos on your cellphone while you’re driving. The current law in most states only bans texting.The advantage of a hands-free law is that if the police officer notes that someone is holding the device while driving, then that is per se evidence of the infraction, so they don’t need to go about proving what the driver was doing. It’ll make enforcement easier and the deterrent effect significantly stronger.GAZETTE: Do you think a hand-held ban would help with distracted driving in Massachusetts?WINSTEN: On the one hand, it doesn’t address another serious form of distraction, namely, cognitive distraction. So it’s not a panacea. But it would certainly help with enforcement of the texting ban, and would extend the range of that ban. We’re not taking an advocacy position in favor of any particular bill. We’re trying to inform the process on the basis of available research. This legislative briefing was the kickoff of what will be an ongoing series of working luncheons sponsored by the center, most of which will be held back at the School. We’re going to bring together researchers, policymakers, police, district attorneys, and corporate representatives.GAZETTE: How big a problem is this? What have we done so far to stop it?WINSTEN: The problem is of tremendous concern. New technology and digital devices have widespread availability, tremendous popularity, and some would even say addictive qualities. It’s certainly a felt need on the part of a lot of people that if they’ve got an incoming message they’ve got to read it right away.According to federal statistics, there are over 1 million crashes each year attributable to distracted driving, over 400,000 injuries, including a hefty number of life-changing injuries, and a little over 3,000 fatalities a year.What you see on suburban roads and rural roads is a lot of head-on collisions. It doesn’t take much when you’re separated from the oncoming driver by just a double yellow line. If the cars in each direction are going 50 miles an hour, you’re closing on each other at a combined speed of 100 miles an hour.It takes 4.6 seconds on average to draft and send a text message. At 50 miles an hour, that’s the equivalent of driving the length of a football field blindfolded. Obviously, no one would ever knowingly do that, but in effect they’re doing it all the time when they’re texting and driving.It’s tough to regulate because of the rapidity of change in the technology. Forty states have a ban on texting while driving, and 14 also have a ban on handheld devices. But, for example, does that include the Apple watch that was just released? Is that a handheld device?And [what about] the infotainment systems that are being installed in new cars? Take Tesla, with a 17-inch touchscreen mounted on the dashboard. And Volvo, known for their preoccupation with safety, they’ve got a 9-inch touchscreen with a tremendous array of capabilities.Volvo has removed almost all of the buttons from the dashboard in its new XC90, and replaced them with functions that you regulate on the touchscreen. That means you have to take one hand off the wheel, you have to take both eyes off the road in order to look to the right at the touchscreen, and you have to work your way through different levels of menu to get to where you want to be.GAZETTE: Is responsibility shared with automakers and cellphone makers? Who’s at fault here?WINSTEN: I guess progress is at fault. The rapid evolution of technology created the problem, but will eventually provide the ultimate solution.General Motors reportedly plans to install tracking devices in 500,000 cars over the next three to five years that will use an array of cameras and algorithms to detect when the driver’s head is turned away from the road for more than a specified amount of time, and will sound an alarm.Other technologies will monitor and autocorrect when a car drifts out of its lane of traffic. And, in 10 to 20 years, we’ll have driverless cars and will be free to text to our hearts’ content. But the transition period between now and then may well be characterized by an awful lot of carnage on our roadways if we’re not careful.In the short term, auto manufacturers and manufacturers of these devices and the software that runs them — such as CarPlay from Apple — have shared responsibility. So do the parents of young people who are, like it or not, serving as role models. Their kids are watching.GAZETTE: What is the role of the Center for Health Communication?WINSTEN: The role of the center is to both study and directly engage in activities aimed at mobilizing mass communication to influence behavior around disease and injury prevention and to help inform public policy.In addition to the working luncheons on distracted driving in Massachusetts, we intend to extend what we’re doing to a national audience. At the same time, we’re developing a new media campaign that will be a counterpart to the center’s previous designated-driver campaign.Over the past several years, there’s been a lot of media activity sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation, in collaboration with the Ad Council, and, notably, AT&T Wireless has had its own media initiative, spending $16 million per year on its “It Can Wait” campaign. Those combined efforts have succeeded in strengthening public awareness of the problem, but they’ve not yet had any kind of significant impact on crashes, injuries, or fatalities.GAZETTE: How do you get it to the next level? Is it going to take some huge tragedy that grabs headlines?WINSTEN: I don’t even think that would make a difference. Among young people, number one, they believe they’re going to live forever. Number two, 80 percent of young adults tell pollsters that they are better drivers than average — which of course literally can’t be true — and that they are really good at multitasking.So the communication campaigns are going to have to back up and really explain, so it’s understood in a visceral way, that a driver may be looking straight ahead, but the brain may not process what the eyes are seeing if the driver’s mind is elsewhere. What’s not yet widely understood is that there are three elements to distraction: visual distraction, manual distraction, and cognitive distraction, which may be the most serious of all.One aspect of cognitive distraction is inattention blindness. A driver may be looking straight ahead when a traffic light turns red and not react to it because the brain’s processing capabilities have been usurped by a phone conversation. The driver is looking but not “seeing” and is not consciously aware of that.Another aspect of cognitive distraction is tunnel vision, in which the distracted driver’s field of vision becomes constricted so they’re not scanning left and right. If a pedestrian enters a crosswalk, a distracted driver looking straight ahead may not notice it. You have children being struck down on the way to school, in crosswalks in school zones. You’ve got police at road stops having to duck for their lives because of oncoming distracted drivers. Likewise workers in work zones, and motorcyclists are in big trouble.GAZETTE: How can you reach people with that information?WINSTEN: Well, it’s tough to break through. We’re talking with NASCAR, for example, about joining our media campaign. We’re hoping to get their top drivers involved. We want to reach young people through YouTube, which already is on board as a partner.When we started the designated-driver campaign, there were only three TV networks, and if you had relationships with all three, you were in business. Today there’s not only an extreme fragmentation of the media marketplace but a very short attention span on the part of the public.So, even if you have a breakthrough creative idea that captures a month’s worth of high-profile media attention, that only buys you 30 days. To change social norms is a multi-year process. So the challenge is how do you put together a series of peaks of synchronicity to sustain the effort over time? That’s what we’re going to try to figure out.It turns out there are some alternatives that provide efficiencies in reaching out to today’s fragmented media universe. For example, there are a small number of firms called multichannel networks, and one of the largest is Fullscreen, co-owned by AT&T Wireless and by Peter Chernin’s group. Peter, the former president and chief operating officer of News Corp., has been a good friend for many years, and he’s helped us to bring Fullscreen on board. Fullscreen represents the creators and developers of 50,000 YouTube channels. And that provides a degree of one-stop shopping for mobilizing widespread support within the new media environment.We have two goals with the distracted-driving initiative. Number one, we want to prevent injuries and save lives. Simultaneously, our media campaign provides an opportunity to experiment with the development of new sustainable communication strategies for public health and, hopefully, to help reinvent the model of public health communication for the 21st century.last_img read more


first_imgEliana Occhino led thew way for 10-1 CBA, opening with a 201 and continuing with a 192 and a 178 to produced a 571 series.Cadence Malicek had a second-game 185 during a 469 series, while Rachel Farella finished with a 183 in her 457 set and Sophie Schultz added a 404 series.A day earlier, CBA beat Chittenango 5-2 as Occhino shot a 524 series with a 193 high game. Farella closed with a 197 in her 505 set as Malicek’s second-game 191 was part of a 502 series. Schultz added a three-game total of 466. Tags: Bishop GrimesbowlingCBAESMF-M CBA’s boys battled Chittenango and had Tavish Johnston shoot a 427 series to lead the Brothers. A 5-2 defeat to Weedsport followed on Wednesday, Garrett Bowman shooting a 429 series.East Syracuse Minoa met Oswego Tuesday afternoon and won despite the Buccaneers’ Eric Carson dazzling with games of 247, 268 and 234 in his 749 series at Lighthouse Lanes.More consistent, the Spartans had Brett Smith shoot a pair of 221 games, plus a 210, in his 652 series, while Chris Bayly closed with a 220 in his 605 set.Ryan Buffum opened with a 217 and ended up with a 596 series, just ahead of Tyler Talarico, who had games of 226 and 222 in his 590 set.The ESM girls got its second win of the season when it topped Oswego 4-1. America Carhart closed with games of 215 and 205 in her 573 series as the Spartans had a 2,084 pinfall to the Bucs’ 1,949.Jessica Weaver chimed in with a 403 series, just ahead of Julie Weaver’s 380 set as Emily Blakeman (369 series) and Olivia Nissen (359 series) followed.In a Thursday rematch with Oswego at Strike-N-Spare, ESM’s boys lost 2-1, watching as Weaver started with a 257, ended with a 276 and recorded a 756 series. Talarico shot 215, 213 and 229 in his 657 series,The girls Spartans also lost 2-1 though Carhart had, by far, the best individual series, her 589 featuring games of 216 and 205 well clear of the top 437 set from the Bucs’ McKenna Cleary.This week for the ESM boys was capped by beating Fulton 3-0 on Friday, Talarico opening with a 257 and moving on to a 688 series. Smith had a 618 series, with Buffum’s 238 opening a 615 set and Bayly’s third-game 245 part of a 605 series.Fayetteville-Manlius visited Baldwinsville last Tuesday, unable to earn a point in either match against the Bees.Kevin Winschel shot games of 226, 205 and 223 in his 654 series at B’ville Sports Bowl as Adam Koss added a 590 series and Dan Fiumara a 498 series. For the Bees, Tanner Rozyczko shot 224, 244 and 237 to earn a 705 series.The F-M girls totaled 2,313 to B’ville’s 2,465, but still lost 3-0. Shelby Miner had games of 204 and 200 in her 555 set to lead the Hornets.Kendra Elliot finished with a 467 series, with Hannah Smith adding a 439 set. On the Bees’ side, it was Jenna Spiech leading with a 572 series and Amelia Ponto contributing a 502 set.Moving to Thursday’s match against West Genesee, F-M’s girls won 3-0 helped by Miner’s 497 series and a 450 set from Smith.But the boys Hornets lost 2-1 to the Wildcats despite Winschel’s 617 series. No one else did better than Dan Fiumara’s 457 set as four WG bowlers matched or topped that series, led by Bobby Bidwell’s 549 setBishop Grimes split a match with Chittenango last Wednesday, winning 7-0 on the boys side as Matt Rogers shot a 543 series and Louis Pelose contributed a 514 set. Joe Belton had a 489 series. The Grimes girls lost again to Chittenango a day later in another 7-0 decision.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story center_img With the calendar closing in on February, it is close to decision time in area high school bowling.And it gets underway next Sunday at Flamingo Bowl in Liverpool with the Section III girls team championships, to be followed a week later by the boys sectional tournament at Utica’a Pin-O-Rama.The Christian Brothers Academy girls team has flourished this winter. When the Brothers swept Weedsport 7-0 Wednesday at Strike-N-Spare Lanes, it clinched the program’s first Onondaga High School League regular-season title.last_img read more