first_imgThe story features a hit-and-run case instead of a shooting partly because it provided a powerful image of a body lying in the snow for 12 hours, Sud said. “Turning on the television and seeing on the nightly news over and over and over this tragedy happening really spoke to me,” said Sud, who lives in Los Angeles. Facebook Toronto-born writer-producer Veena Sud, whose previous credits include the “The Killing,” says she came up with the idea for “Seven Seconds” after “turning on the television and seeing black men and young children being shot almost on a nightly basis.” “I’m still Canadian but it’s the first time I’ve been back in Toronto since then, so it’s special being back,” Sud said. “When I thought about police violence in black and brown communities, and the absolute helplessness or ignorance in the judicial system in dealing with it in a way that is right, it felt very fitting that the Statue of Liberty’s back was turned,” Sud said.“The other reason is people are now familiar that it’s happening all over America, not just in the South. I really wanted to tell a story about a microcosm of every American city, that police violence is not a southern problem but it’s an American problem.” Login/Register With: TORONTO — A new Netflix crime drama explores the racial tensions resulting from police misconduct in the U.S. — and it was created by a Canadian. “The amount of blood that’s left in the white snow, in a place that really exists in the States, which is right across the water from the Statue of Liberty, is clearly so symbolic of the American condition at this point in our history.” “Seven Seconds” has “one of the most diverse if not the most diverse writers’ room in the industry,” Sud said. “Their bodies were left in the street or in a playground for hours, in full public view, uncared for, unloved. Their families couldn’t go to them, almost like a testimony to their lives not mattering enough to give them a modicum of respect.” When conversation turned to how her Twitter handle says “Canadian-born,” Sud added with a laugh: “I definitely am not proud of being American right now.” Sud’s other upcoming projects include a dark family drama film starring Cas Anvar, Peter Sarsgaard and Joey King. Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Veena Sud is shown in a handout photo. A new Netflix crime drama is tackling the issue of racial tensions resulting from police misconduct in the U.S. and it was created by a Canadian. Toronto-born writer-producer Sud, whose previous credits include the “The Killing,” says she came up with the idea for “Seven Seconds” after “turning on the television and seeing black men and young children being shot almost on a nightly basis.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-JoJo Whilden/Netflix MANDATORY CREDIT Sud set the series in Jersey City, where she used to live, feeling the view of the Statue of Liberty with its back turned to a diverse community to be ironic. Twitter “African-American, Latino, Asian-Pacific Islander, white — and the white writers are the minority — half women,” she added. Other cast members include Regina King and Russell Hornsby as the teen’s parents, and Clare-Hope Ashitey as the troubled assistant prosecutor. “We’re not doing it because someone is telling us to do it but doing it because these are the best writers out there … and that’s something that our industry and every industry in America has to start opening its doors to all of the talent, not just a few.” “It was post-Ferguson, the murder of Michael Brown; post-Baltimore, the killing of Freddie Gray; and watching the courage of an (attorney) like Marilyn Mosby in Baltimore trying to take on the system and bring to justice the officers who had killed a man.” She recently shot it in Toronto, where she grew up until age two, when her family moved to the U.S. “I think one of the biggest influences for me in telling this story was hearing over and over — in the wake of a shooting, in the wake of the death — how these young children and young men were left,” she said. Advertisement Launching Friday, the anthology series stars Beau Knapp as a white New Jersey cop who accidentally hits a black teenager with his car. His cop colleagues stage a coverup, resulting in racial tensions in the city as the case unfolds. It’s a recurring image Sud saw play out in the real-life cases in the news. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more


first_imgPaul Tuccaro, Amber’s brother read from the report.“In effect approximately one month passed without any effort being made at the detachment level to investigate Ms. Tuccaro’s disappearance.”The family has waited four years for a response.“What choice did we have?” asked Paul Tuccaro when asked if it the wait was acceptable.Click here for more on Amber TuccaroIn August of 2012, two years after she went missing, the RCMP’s Project KARE investigators held a news conference and released the cell phone recording of Tuccaro and an unknown male.Between 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Tuccaro got into a vehicle driven by the unknown man. While she was in the vehicle someone phoned Tuccaro who was overheard asking the unknown man where they were going.“Where are we by?” says Tuccaro.“We’re just heading south of Beaumont or north of Beaumont.”“You better not take, you better not be taking me anywhere I don’t wanna go. I wanna go into the city. Okay?” she says.She keeps asking him where they are driving to.The man claims they’re going to “East” 50th St.Then Tuccaro appears to ask what they’re driving on and the man says “gravel.”The conversation ends.The call is approximately 17 minutes long.In November of 2017, Paul Tuccaro was the first to testify at the National Inquiry for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls hearings in Edmonton.He spent most of his testimony laying out his complaints about how the RCMP handled the case.The Tuccaro family says they are looking at all legal options [email protected]@HollyMooreaptn Holly MooreAPTN NewsA long awaited response to a complaint filed by the family of Amber Tuccaro has found “deficiencies” in the RCMP investigation into her murder.Tuccaro’s family held a news conference in Edmonton Alta., Wednesday to reveal some of the details found in the 120 page report released to them by the RCMP Civilian Review and Complaints Commission.The 20-year-old Mikisew Cree First Nation mother of one was last seen in August 2010 after leaving a Nisku, Alta. motel room. Her skull was found two years later in rural Leduc country, 35 km south of Edmonton.last_img read more