first_imgHigh school students can explore the sciences through a variety of hands-on summer programs offered by the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES).Participants will work with live animals; tour UGA laboratories, classrooms and greenhouses; and work with current UGA students and faculty members with shared interests. These programs give participating students a good idea of what their experience at CAES may be like should they choose to pursue a degree in the college.There are five enrichment camps set for UGA’s Athens campus in 2018.Animal Science in Action camp is intended for rising high school juniors and seniors with an interest in an animal science career. The camp runs from Thursday, May 31, to Friday, June 1, and costs $150. The application deadline is Tuesday, May 1.Georgia Plant Science Scholars camp provides a chance for students to participate in a science conference where they present team creations on plant and science topics. It runs Sunday, June 24, to Wednesday, June 27, and has an application deadline of Friday, April 20. The cost is $250.The ADVANCE Ag Institute is intended for rising high school seniors interested in pursuing an education and a career in agriculture. Students partake in classes and laboratory sessions. The institute takes place from Sunday, June 24, to Wednesday, June 27, and the registration deadline is May 25. The cost is $250.The Livestock Judging Camp is for students interested in improving their livestock examining skills. It is open to 4-H or FFA members rising to grades six through 12. The camp runs June 26- 28, and the deadline to register is Wednesday, May 25. The cost of this camp is $100.The Poultry Science Open House is a daylong event that gives high school students and potential college transfers an opportunity to interact with UGA poultry science faculty. The open house takes place on Friday, July 20, and is free to students. The deadline to register is Friday, July 13.All of these programs offer tools for students exploring career paths in the life, environmental and agricultural sciences. These camps will prepare students for college, inform their goals and give them a good idea of what life is like as a CAES major.For more information about these programs, visit www.students.caes.uga.edu/prospective/high-school-programs.html.last_img read more


first_imgBert L. Wagner, age 90 of Bright, Indiana passed away Tuesday, November 5, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Born November 8, 1928 in Saylor Park, Ohio the son of Bertram and Mary (Kottmeyer) Wagner.Bert graduated from Western Hills High School in 1947. Married Ruth Elaine Tompkins June 26, 1954 at First Presbyterian Church of Delhi. Served his country proudly in the United States Army. Was a charter member of the Bright Lions Club, in Bright, Indiana, and a member of the Providence Presbyterian Church. Served as President of Dearborn County Planning and Zoning for 25 years and for the State of Indiana for several years.Bert is survived by his children Tom (Sue) Wagner, Andrew Wagner and Barbara (Todd) Garcia. Grandfather of Ashley (Eric) Baker, Nicholas (Molly) Garcia, Elaina (Ryan) Soto, Lauren Wagner and Victoria Garcia. Great grandfather of Olivia Baker, Joseph Garcia and Claire Baker.Proceeded in death by his parents Bertram and Mary Wagner, his beloved wife, Ruth Elaine Wagner and his twin sister, Betty Laycock.Visitation will be held Saturday November 9, 2019 from 10:00 A. M. until time of funeral services at 11:00 A. M. all at Providence Presbyterian Church 23983 Salt Fork Road Bright, Indiana 47025 with Rev. Dan Johnson officiating. Burial will follow at Gibson Cemetery Bight, Indiana with military honors provided by the US Army.Memorial may be directed to the Bright Lions Club c/o Jackman Hensley Funeral Home 215 Broadway Street Harrison, Ohio 45030.last_img read more


first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — A Memorial Day Service will be held at Prairie Lawn Cemetery on Monday, May 27, at 10 a.m.Frank Korte, Past Commander for the American Legion Post #90, will be making the address. Also, don’t forget, to help volunteer to put up flags at the cemetery starting at 8 a.m. (see information here).The order of the service is as follows:Welcome – Commander James Lockhart.National Anthem – Melanie Dawson.Raising of the Colors – Boys Scout Troop 303 and 304.Pledge of Allegiance – Commander Lockhart.Invocation – Chaplain Wayne White.General Logan’s Order #11 – Jim Valentine.Address of the day – Frank Korte, Past Commander.Placings of the wreaths – announced by Commander Lockhart – Those placing wreaths include representatives of the following service organizations and conflicts:American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Veterans of Foreign War Auxiliary, World War 1 veterans, World War II veterans, Korean War Veterans, Vietnam Veterans, Grenada, Panama, Gulf War Veterans, Afghanistan, Iraqi War Veterans, 40 & 8, 8 & 40, American Red Cross, Boys Scouts, Girl Scouts, Explorer Post 303, Sons of the American Legion; and American Legion Riders.Saluting our Comrades – Members of the American Legion Post #90 firing squad.Taps – Melanie Dawson and Jeremy Burden.Dismissed – Commander Lockhart. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more


first_imgOTTAWA – “Since we formed government, the Canadian economy has created over 60 per cent more full-time jobs than the Conservatives did over the same time period.” — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Aug. 14, 2018.___Hoping to beat back Conservative claims that their environment-friendly agenda is a costly jobs killer, the Liberal government has been burnishing its economic record lately, insisting that it has done better at creating jobs than its Tory predecessor.It’s an important exercise in spin for a government whose central brand is about convincing Canadians that “the environment and the economy go hand-in-hand” — that fighting climate change, in other words, needn’t come at the expense of economic growth.Hence the recent message from Trudeau and other cabinet ministers that since being elected in 2015, the Liberal government has created 60 per cent more jobs in Canada than the Conservatives did during the same time period.Are they telling the truth?Spoiler alert: The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney” (complete methodology below).This one earns a rating of “a lot of baloney.” Here’s why.THE FACTSOfficials in the Prime Minister’s Office pointed to Employment Minister Patty Hajdu’s office to provide a breakdown of how Trudeau came up with that 60 per cent figure.Veronique Simard, a spokeswoman for Hajdu, said the Liberal government created 542,500 full-time jobs in the 33 months since winning the 2015 election, while the Conservatives under former prime minister Stephen Harper “created just 322,300 full-time jobs in its last 33 months in office.”Trudeau wasn’t the only one spreading the message: in a response to Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre deriding the Liberal carbon plan as a “job killer,” Environment Minister Catherine McKenna tweeted, “Our government has created 60 per cent more jobs than the Harper Conservatives did in the same time period.”“The Canadian economy is humming,” she wrote. “Our emissions are dropping. We have a plan and it’s working.”THE NUMBERSTo calculate the number of jobs created over a specific period, The Canadian Press relied on figures from Statistics Canada for full-time jobs each month. The agency reports the total number of people employed monthly, which stood at 15.1 million full-time workers in July.Calculations by CP confirmed the data provided by Hajdu’s office: 542,500 new full-time jobs between October 2015 and July 2018, and just 322,300 new jobs between January 2013 and October 2015 — a difference, for the record, of 59.4 per cent.But there’s more to the claim than just the numbers.THE EXPERTSFor one thing, there’s the familiar political convention of taking credit for economic growth — a practice that brings to mind the old saw about “lies, damned lies and statistics.”Any suggestion that the Liberals are “somehow responsible” for those numbers confuses the sequence of events with causality, said Stephen Gordon, an economics professor at Laval University.“The fact that this is done so often doesn’t make it any less wrong,” said Gordon — no fan, he said, of using such statistics to suggest that the arrival of any new government results in more jobs.But for the sake of argument, the Liberals should be comparing their first 33 months not with the end of the Harper era, but the beginning — a period that saw 635,400 new jobs between January 2006 and October 2008.“If you’re going to argue that the arrival of a Liberal government leads to increased employment, you might as well argue that the arrival of a Conservative government has an even stronger effect on employment,” Gordon said.“It’s a stupid game to be playing, and I wish politicians would stop playing it.”Governments often “claim credit for — and take blame for — economic performance for which they often have little control,” added Emmett Macfarlane, a political science professor at the University of Waterloo.“Stephen Harper was no more responsible for the 2008 global recession than Justin Trudeau was for job growth in the month he was elected.”Using month-by-month statistics to measure performance in the job market can be unreliable, since the story can change dramatically, depending on which months are chosen as reference points, said Sheila Block, senior economist from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.During the Conservative government’s first 33 months in office, the economy was booming, while their last 33 months included a collapse in oil prices, she noted.THE VERDICTIn truth, governments of all stripes take credit for short-term and medium-term economic indicators that are actually beyond their control. And they are selective about the data they choose to promote, as well as the time frames, to ensure it supports their narrative.Indeed, by contrasting their first 33 months with the Conservative government’s last 33 months, they are effectively comparing apples and oranges.METHODOLOGYThe Baloney Meter is a project of The Canadian Press that examines the level of accuracy in statements made by politicians. Each claim is researched and assigned a rating based on the following scale:No baloney — the statement is completely accurate.A little baloney — the statement is mostly accurate but more information is required.Some baloney — the statement is partly accurate but important details are missing.A lot of baloney — the statement is mostly inaccurate but contains elements of truth.Full of baloney — the statement is completely inaccurate.last_img read more