first_imgThey opted for biorobots made of sperm cells and turned to bull sperm cells, Schmidt said, according to New Scientist, that reasons why sperm cells were an attractive choice were that they were harmless to the body, they could swim through viscous liquids, and they did not need any external power source. The researchers produced microtubes and worked with thawed-out bull sperm cells, remaining viable for several hours. According to New Scientist, the microtubes are made from iron and titanium nanoparticles. Scientists have shown how controlled sperm cells inside tubes can be driven to target destinations using magnetic control. The significance of their investigation lies partly in what may be in store for in vitro fertilization. “Eventually,” said a report in New Scientist, “these biobots could be used to shepherd individual sperm to eggs or to deliver targeted doses of drugs.” The researchers, from the Institute for Integrative Nanosciences (IIN) in Dresden, Germany, demonstrated how remote-controlled “sperm-bots” can be used to fertilize eggs. A paper on their work was published last month in Advanced Materials and the topic continues to draw interest in this month’s technology and science news sites. The December paper, “Development of a Sperm-Flagella Driven Micro-Bio-Robot,” is by Veronika Magdanz, Samuel Sanchez, and Oliver G. Schmidt. They developed “a new biohybrid micro-robot” by capturing bovine sperm cells inside tubes that used the motile cells as the driving force. An external magnetic field controlled the robots. More information: Press release in GermanPaper: Development of a Sperm-Flagella Driven Micro-Bio-Robot, Advanced Materials, DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302544AbstractA new biohybrid micro-robot is developed by capturing bovine sperm cells inside magnetic microtubes that use the motile cells as driving force. These micro-bio-robots can be remotely controlled by an external magnetic field. The performance of micro-robots is described in dependence on tube radius, cell penetration, and temperature. The combination of a biological power source and a microdevice is a compelling approach to the development of new microrobotic devices with fascinating future applications. Journal information: Advanced Materials Researchers discover sperm move along a ‘twisting ribbon’ Credit: Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung Dresden Schmidt, the Institute’s director, and his IIN colleagues combined the cells with magnetic metal tubes. Basically, the investigation involved live flagella from bull sperm to maneuver nanotubes in a desired direction using magnets. Changes in temperature were able to control their speeds.According to a report on their work in Gizmag, the team intends to try assisted fertilization with animals before starting experiments with human sperm. One additional possibility is that their research might impact future investigations in targeted drug delivery, where drugs may be ferried along within the body. Another interesting feature about this research is how it involves use of “biobots” as opposed to artificial engines. As Gizmag noted, a concern in research is that a nanobot intended to move through bodily fluids should not be toxic to the human body and should not cause harm to cells, affecting their functioning. The IIN scientists discussed safe “nano-engine” alternatives, or suitable “biorobots.” Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play Credit: Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung Dresden Citation: Sperm-bots are made to move in desired direction (w/ Video) (2014, January 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-sperm-bots-desired-video.html © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


first_imgKolkata: The year is going to end on a sweet note for the people of Kolkata as a three-day ‘rosogolla’ festival is being organized in the city to pay tribute to its inventor Nobin Chandra Das. Bengal had last year received a Geographical Indication (GI) tag for the round-shaped syrupy sweet. The three-day gala, beginning December 28, will celebrate 150 years of ‘rosogolla’ invention, said West Bengal minister Sashi Panja. “The first-ever ‘Baghbazar-O-Rosogolla Utsab’, supported by the state government, is aimed at paying tribute to Das and his invention of the syrupy cheeseball, which went on to conquer taste buds across the world,” Panja, who is also the chief convener of the fest, told reporters here recently. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life The sweetmeat festival will also highlight the history, heritage and culture of Baghbazar – the hub of the Bengal renaissance, she said. Singer Hariharan is set to grace the occasion and enthrall visitors with his performance. The fest committee, with painter Suvaprasanna as chief adviser and the rosogolla inventor’s heir Dhiman Das as member, has also arranged for cooking competitions and quiz contests. Sweetmeat traders from across the state will get an opportunity to dish out their signature items during the three-day fiesta, Panja, the state minister for women and child development and social welfare, said. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed “I fell very proud that Rosogolla has been invented in this city, in Baghbazar. We will also observe 100 years of Bagbazar Sarbojanin Durgotsav (annual Durga puja) at the fest,” she added. Nobin Chandra Das had opened a sweet shop at Jorasanko in north Kolkata in 1864, but he tasted success after moving his business to Baghbazar in 1866. It was sometime in 1868, when he created ‘rosogolla’ out of fragmented clumps of cottage cheese and sugar syrup.last_img read more