first_imgWith Dead & Company tour in full swing, band members Bob Weir and John Mayer sat down with the Asbury Park Press ahead of the band’s New Jersey debut. The two guitarists talk extensively about building a large musical catalog with diverse influences, and how each are astute in hearing these influences and learning from one another.“When John plays blues, you can hear what subgenre he’s going for,” said Weir. “He’s real well-versed in particularly that idiom, but what that told me is that he’s basically a student and fan of American musical heritage.”He continued, saying “I could hear (Mayer’s) appreciation of the various fields, and that’s where our music comes from… We grew up — the guys in The Grateful Dead — grew up in an era in the Bay Area out here, where you had everything that America had to offer on the radio. And we were the kinds of kids who were just playing the buttons on the radio.”“If there was something playing that wasn’t catching our interest, we hit another button. We’d go from rock ’n’ roll to jazz to R&B or blues stations, classical music – whatever it took to grab our attention… And we were all different guys, but we all had that same approach, most particularly Jerry and I.” It seems Mayer has a similar mindset, something that Bob Weir finds endearing. Mayer chimed in about his own influences and mindset for building a diverse repertoire. “When you’re into music the way that Bob and I are, and you know, we’re separated by a lot of geography, a lot of time, but there’s a certain way to be in the music where it’s almost like collecting baseball cards… It’s like you collect the Texas blues card. You collect the Chicago electric blues card. You collect the country-western card.”“And it’s sort of like this love of all these different little cards you can collect and keep in a little stack and walk around with them in your back pocket.  It really for me was just about like sort of just getting another card or trading a card, you know?  And when musicians look at music that way, where it’s just sort of like this Rolodex of influences, it’s actually really great to have that conversation musically, and it’s just a matter of rearranging the cards a little bit.”That’s really part of the Grateful Dead magic, being able to go from folk to blues to funk in the drop of a hat. With these two guitarists up in front and the supreme talents of musicians like Bill Kreutzmann, Mickey Hart, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti, there’s plenty of magic left to come!last_img read more


first_img– Advertisement – Tyrone Mings says he’s been impressed by Borussia Dortmund teenager Jude Bellingham following his call-up to the senior England squad. Still six months from his first-team bow, his name first entered the public eye when was featured in FourFourTwo‘s ’50 most exciting teenagers in English football’ in February 2019, but inside St Andrew’s, there had long been excitement about his huge potential. Clotet, still conscious Bellingham had barely finished his GCSEs, was nonetheless keen to see how this undoubted talent would hold up against players bigger, older, and wilier than the 16-year-old – especially given the club’s off-field issues and transfer funds at a premium.That would have to mean exposure to the professional game, and within weeks of signing a two-year scholarship in July 2019, he was on the plane to Portugal as part of Birmingham’s pre-season training camp.“As soon as he started to train with us in the first team, and when he properly joined us for pre-season last season, he was very quick to mix with the professionals and train at their level and he physically adapted very, very quick,” Clotet said.“He was able to perform with the talent he had alongside the physical demands as a professional. You could see straight away he was going to be a big player.“I never hesitated on giving him a debut, or pushing his career forward, because I thought he was ready. When he made his debut in the League Cup against Portsmouth, it was a chance to test him against a League One side in a competitive game, and he was up to the level. – Advertisement – Jude Bellingham’s first manager Pep Clotet explains to Sky Sports News the teen’s incredible 15-month journey from his Birmingham debut to first England call-up.Bellingham could become England’s third-youngest player if he features across the international break, having been called up to replace James Ward-Prowse ahead of their games with the Republic of Ireland, Belgium and Iceland.- Advertisement – WOLVERHAMPTON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 13: Jude Bellingham of England during the UEFA Euro Under 21 Qualifier match between England U21 and Turkey U21 at Molineux on October 13, 2020 in Wolverhampton, England. Sporting stadiums around the UK remain under strict restrictions due to the Coronavirus Pandemic as Government social distancing laws prohibit fans inside venues resulting in games being played behind closed doors. (Photo by Visionhaus) “From the first time I saw him for the U18s, straight away you could see he had an incredible talent on him,” Clotet told Sky Sports News. “You could see he was a huge complete player already, and obviously his level and talent was above the level he was playing.“I wanted to test his skill, and his level, higher up the ranks, so when he started to train with the U23s you could see he was performing in the same way as when he was in the younger age groups.”Temperament beyond his yearsWeeks after Bellingham became the latest England-born prospect to sign for one of Europe’s biggest teams, Borussia Dortmund, earlier this year, head coach Lucien Favre would say: “With someone like Jude Bellingham, I don’t look at the date of birth.”Barely 12 months earlier, only one question mark remained over the teenager’s talent – how would he handle the mental and physical pressures of the senior game?Succeeding in U23s football was one thing, but England’s Professional Development Leagues have long been tainted by accusations of being uncompetitive and a pale imitation of ‘men’s football’. Jude Bellingham joined Borussia Dortmund for £25m in July “He was one of the most important players in our team on that day and he performed very, very well.”Bellingham was introduced to the St Andrew’s crowd only weeks later as a first-half substitute in their Championship game with Stoke – and ended a matchwinner after netting Birmingham’s second in a 2-1 win.“You could never think he would come through that quickly,” said Clotet. “But I always had in my mind he would become one of the first-teamers, and help us not only to perform on the pitch but also become a very strong player for linking a very divided club at that moment.“I’m happy that this vision happened, you need a little bit of luck as well, but it all went like that and it helped to have one of the best seasons for Birmingham because it’s not easy in the circumstances that team had to bed in a player of such a huge talent that is able to achieve now what he is achieving.“That was my vision, and what I saw could happen, I saw it in him.”Where would he fit in best?England have largely deployed a 3-4-3 formation since the start of this season, often with two defensively minded midfielders in the middle of the park.Bellingham played a large part of his one senior season at Birmingham, before moving onto join Borussia Dortmund last summer, as part of a two – but Clotet feels a 4-3-3 would best suit his undoubted talent, which has seen him since become the German club’s youngest ever goalscorer – and perhaps this week, one of England’s most youthful debutants.Clotet said: “In my opinion, his best position is in a 4-3-3 as an offensive midfielder. He feels very comfortable offensively, in a position he’s able to attack the box, but you must ensure as a manager he has the freedom.“He has a very good skill in hiding his movement so can get out of situations and find his way into a shot or cross.“When a player drives the ball forward, he is normally very focused on the ball but Jude gets out of space. He’s able to see what’s around him, without the need to be constantly watching what’s happening on the ball because his skill is massive.” His debut would come barely 15 months after he made his first senior appearance, against League One side Portsmouth, in a Carabao Cup game wearing the shirt of his boyhood club Birmingham City, and in the process becoming the youngest player in the club’s history.His route to the first team had been impressively fast, but no great surprise to his then-manager Pep Clotet, who was first taken aback by the quality of the midfielder while watching him feature for the club’s academy a year earlier.Bellingham was immediately moved up to the club’s U23 side where, in what was no huge surprise, he scored on his debut and continued to excel, before soon beginning to attract attention from further afield.- Advertisement – 0:25 Sky Sports News reporter Rob Dorsett explains why England manager Gareth Southgate has called up Borussia Dortmund teenager Jude Bellingham to the senior squad for the first time. Jude Bellingham needs to carry on playing as he his, according to England team-mate Bukayo Saka. Jude Bellingham in action for England's U21s 3:53 0:43last_img read more


first_img StumbleUpon Submit Share Share Related Articles Soft2Bet continues new market drive with Irokobet launch August 26, 2020 Genesis to appeal UKGC’s ‘disproportionate suspension’ July 23, 2020 TVBET passes GLI test for five live games in Malta and Italy August 25, 2020 Updating the market, the Malta Gaming Authority (MGA) has published it’s ‘Preliminary Market Consultation – PMC’ document requesting information and guidance on the planned development and launch of its ‘Unified Self-Exclusion System’.A key project initiative for the MGA and its government stakeholders, the gaming authority seeks to deliver the most comprehensive self-exclusion system to be utilised by all licensed incumbents.First announced in May 2018, the MGA seeks to revamp its licensee self-exclusion protocols and frameworks, introducing a unified system which will aim to register and block all self-excluded players from engaging with MGA licensed operators.“The MGA envisages that a Unified Self-Exclusion System would be a significant step forward in the MGA’s agenda to implement further control for the prevention of gambling-related harm, extending the criteria of its Player Protection Directive, and The Gaming Premises Regulations,” the MGA details in its update.In 2019 the MGA states that it will strengthen its consumer safeguards and all-around gambling protections, adding new enforcements to its online gambling licensing frameworks.This January, the MGA launched its new Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) function – an enforced scheme that will monitor and arbitrate disputes/challenges between consumers and licensed operators, with regards to transactions and promotional offerings.In its update, the MGA seeks stakeholder advice/opinion on current self-exclusion protocols (benefits/flaws), as well as guidance on technology matters attached to consumer protections, databasing, record keeping and developing further comprehensive ‘compliant systems’ benefitting igaming/betting consumers.last_img read more


first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LONG BEACH – Up until the midway point in the second quarter, it seemed like the Millikan High girls water polo team had a good chance of keeping pace with top-ranked Foothill and possibly be in great shape at the end to stage a huge upset. Then, for whatever reason, Rams committed a series of uncharacteristic errors that turned a two-goal deficit into six at the end of intermission, and ultimately to a 13-6 loss in the quarterfinals of CIF-SS Division I playoffs on Tuesday. “We knew that they had done very well against big-name teams,” Foothill coach David Mikesell said about the Rams. “It wasn’t a walk in the park. I like to think that our defense has done that to teams all year.” The Rams (17-13) trailed 4-2 at 4:50 left in the second period. Then everything started to fall apart. First the team drew a 6-on-5 advantage, but threw the ball out of bounds. After that, the defense gave up a goal to Katie Groff at 3:33 to increase the Knights’ lead to 5-2. center_img Next, Melissa Matheson, Millikan’s 2-meter, prematurely jumped in the pool, which resulted in her drawing an exclusion for the rest of the game and a goal on the 5-meter penalty shot by Kealy McClaire. To top it off, Kallie Berry was assessed a 20-second exclusion on a kick-out penalty. And with 58 seconds left, on a man-up opportunity, Mclaire of Foothill (28-1) scored on the counterattack off a pass from Kathryn Bustard. Seconds later, Bustard scored off a pass from Jessica Kutcher to increase the Knights’ lead to 8-2 at intermission. “In the second quarter, we did a substitution, and (Matheson) jumped in too early,” Millikan coach Tim Fredricksen said about the ejection. “We lost our frontcourt. Our starting 2-meter Meike Howell has been only 50 percent all year. Melissa Matheson had been doing a great job for us all year. When we lost her, they got three goals.” Tabitha Absmiere and Berry each added two goals apiece for Millikan. last_img read more