first_imgJimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys reinvented the traditional, Jimi Hendrix Experience vibe with its unique mosaic of sound and integrative acoustics. The original live recordings showcased a harmonious groove, led by Billy Cox‘s powerful guitar, Buddy Miles‘s percussion, and overall vocal mastery. This past weekend, Roosevelt Collier, along with Dopapod members Rob Compa and Chuck Jones and TAUK’s Isaac Teel, led a vibrant Band of Gypsys tribute at New York City’s American Beauty.Collier, a pedal-steel maestro and Hendrix aficionado, immersed the venue in rich, late 60’s era jams. As the industry heavyweight dazzled the intimate venue, each crowd goer was awed in his outstanding craft. Collier provides a sound that is truly soulful, rhythmic, and indicative of his remarkable talent. Compa (Guitar) and Jones (Bass) evinced their inventive sound while encapsulating Cox’s trademark Band of Gypsys feel. The duo approached Cox’s string-filled prominence in their prolific instrumentals that boast contemporary sound. Teel presented pure percussion mastery that assumed a unique approach to the craft with surprise vocals and respectful nods to Miles’s old-school talent. Collectively, each artist pursued his mastery in a compilation of groovy jams that paid serious homage to the infamous live album.The Band of Gypsys led the night with a setlist boasting tracks, “Who Knows,” “Changes,” “We Gotta Live Together,” and “Foxy Lady,” to name a few. While Collier soaked the evening in an upbeat atmosphere led by poetic steel driven notes, “Who Knows,” fluttered throughout the room in a vintage and psychedelic feel. Teel led the tune in his vocals, an instrument on its own, belting, “She didn’t know/ And she didn’t care/ She didn’t know/ She didn’t care/ And she go walking/ Down the street singing.” The robust tones of Teel’s vocals led the crowd into the infamous lyrics to later come together in harmony. Collective hymns are integral to the tune and indicative of the crowds’ undeniable enthusiasm. The band led the jam into, “Changes,” another track from the live album. Collier rendered the formerly dark and jammy track into a slow and harmonious rendition with impressive vocals. As opposed to emphasizing heavy instrumentals, the band illuminated its soulful side with intoxicating lyrics. Teel chanted, “It’s alright baby/ Yeah it’s alright,” while Collier laced the track with fluttering notes and contributive vocals. The delightful chorus hardened throughout the room in its dark and soulful haze. In true Jimi Fashion, Collier pronounced, “We’d like you to clap your hands,” as the crowd clapped and cheered the band drew out a thick jam that was brought into, “We Gotta Live Together.” The crowd cheered as Teel belted, “Home sweet home! Home sweet home!” giving American Beauty a sense that New York can be home to any who are in tune to admire.Intense bass took center stage as Jones dug out a ravine for guitarist prominence, complimented by Compa’s penetrating notes. Bass ensued, immersing American Beauty in an instrumental haze. Collier prompted the crowd, pressing, “Is everyone having a good time out there?!” as the crowd was clearly responsive in their cheers, he threw a head nod to the late Hendrix, proclaiming, “Enjoy this Jimi!” Compa and Jones continued in their guitarist prowess, caressed by Teel’s sound. A slow rendition of, “Fire” encompassed the room while Teel belted, “Let me stand/ Let me stand/ Let me stand next to your fire.” This slow and sexy rendition of the traditionally excited track had the entire crowd slow dancing and singing along to the enticing lyrics.Collier prompted the crowd with the night’s last song, an essential Jimi tune, “Foxy Lady.” Amongst the bands’ head nods, strums, and jamming that constructing this high energy cover, Compa poured his both his instrumental and vocal talent into its composition. Compa belted, “I’ve made up my mind/ I’m tired of wasting all my precious time/ You got to be all mine/ Foxy.” As Compa roared the sultry lyrics, the room was filled with a delightful, nostalgic haze that is beautifully trademark to the Jimi Hendrix sound. The night came to a close as the track struck a harmonious chord. American Beauty was immersed in the jam-driven, sensual vibe led by “Foxy.” The tune laid down a warm glow that bounced off the venue’s walls and christened the night with infectious smiles.Check out full audio from the night below, courtesy of taper Eric McRoberts.last_img read more


first_imgNot only is it important to back up your data but accessing and managing that data is just as important. What’s the point of a backup if you can’t access it? Dell EMC Data Protection is a market leader due to its combined portfolio of Data Domain backup appliances, Integrated Data Protection Appliances and Data Protection software.  Last quarter, Dell EMC’s Data Domain lead the Target Systems segment of the Purpose Built Backup Appliance (PBBA) market with a 75% revenue share and saw a year over year growth rate of 44%.1 Customers trust Dell EMC for data protection because of our unmatched combination of appliances and software and that are designed to deliver increased simplicity, flexibility, and operational efficiency.The Dell EMC Data Domain Management Center (DD MC), is your single pane of glass to view and manage your Data Domain appliances, physical or software defined. DD MC enables aggregate management and reporting on environments with multiple Data Domain systems through a single interface. Customizable dashboards provide visibility into aggregate status and the ability to drill-down to system-level details. Role based access allows different user roles for various levels of expertise within the organization.The latest release of Dell EMC Data Domain Operating System, DD OS 6.1.2, delivers enhanced efficiency by providing a single point of manageability solution to manage Data Domain appliances located on-prem, at remote sites or in any cloud with DD MC. Wherever a business operates, they can manage their central data centers, remote offices and cloud protection elegantly from one location. This hybrid management capability can further reduce operational costs, as well as empower entire organizations with key insights. DD MC is now available as a free, no-license download with DD OS 6.1.2 and can be run on-prem or in the cloud.Dell EMC continues to drive innovation and success for the Data Domain family. Now is the perfect time to connect with your local rep about purchasing new appliances or upgrading to a complete Dell EMC Data Protection solution with the latest DD OS 6.1.2.You can download DD MC with the installation of DD OS 6.1.2. If you are a subscriber to AWS and Azure marketplace, you can download from AWS Marketplace and Azure Marketplace.For additional information, please see DD MC Installation and Administration Guide.Check out our social presence on Twitter for product updates and announcements.1Source:  IDC Quarterly Purpose Built Backup Appliance Tracker, Q2 2018last_img read more


first_img “If we are serious about a pandemic, we should assume it is going to be imminent and we should be prepared as if it is imminent—not 10, 15 years down the road, but imminent,” said David Fedson, MD, a retired vaccine industry executive who has published analyses of pandemic vaccine planning (see Bibliography: Fedson 2007: Author interview). The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the primary conduit of federal flu research funds to scientists, believes it does have a robust research agenda. Dr. Carole Heilman, director of the division of microbiology and infectious diseases, points to the flu-research recommendations issued by a blue-ribbon NIAID panel this year as evidence that the agency is guiding extramural researchers to critical questions about flu (see Bibliography: Heilman 2007, NIAID 2007). But with funding limited until recently, much of the research being conducted came into being because of private-sector interests rather than an overarching plan, said longtime flu researcher Dr. Arnold Monto of the University of Michigan (see Bibliography: Monto 2007). “An effort on the scale of the Apollo space project is required,” the IDSA said. By challenging the WHO, Indonesia deprived the international community of a key source of information on emerging flu viruses. It also emboldened other developing countries to join its protest, leading to a week-long negotiation at the annual World Health Assembly (WHA), a WHA resolution promising reconsideration of the virus-sharing system, and WHO commitments to invest in vaccine manufacturing in the developing world. The concessions did not completely repair relations, however: The question of control over viruses remains open and will be discussed again at a WHO meeting in Geneva that opens Nov 5 (see Bibliography: McKenna 2007: System for global; McKenna 2007: Virus ownership). The pandemic vaccine puzzle But implicit in the invocation of that all-out effort is a hunger for the power, funding, freedom from bureaucracy, and single-minded focus that its leaders enjoyed. The Manhattan Project was founded at emergency speed: The lag time between Albert Einstein’s famous letter advising President Franklin Roosevelt that nuclear fission might permit the creation of “extremely powerful bombs” and the first meeting of a newly formed federal Advisory Committee on Uranium was a mere 10 days. The project’s chief, Brigadier General Leslie Groves, was handpicked for his reputation for ruthless efficiency. Even after the United States entered World War II in December 1941, the project boasted the ability to cherry-pick any staff and claim any funding it needed; eventually it employed 130,000 people and received $2 billion in 1940s dollars (about $23 billion today). Editor’s note: This is the last in a seven-part series investigating the prospects for development of vaccines to head off the threat of an influenza pandemic posed by the H5N1 avian influenza virus. The series puts promising advances in vaccine technology in perspective by illuminating the formidable barriers to producing large amounts of an effective and widely usable vaccine in a short time. Part 6 explored the potential of novel vaccine technologies such as using whole flu viruses or growing vaccines in cell cultures instead of in eggs. A chorus of calls to actionCalls have come from across the political spectrum for a more aggressive, better-funded, tightly organized research effort. Former Senate Majority Leader William H. Frist (R-Tenn.) called in August 2005 for a “Manhattan Project for the 21st century” (see Bibliography: Frist 2005). In the same month, Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of CIDRAP News, recommended the creation of “an international project to develop the ability to produce a vaccine for the entire global population within several months of the start of a pandemic [that would be] a top priority of the Group of Seven industrialized nations plus Russia (the G-8)” (see Bibliography: Osterholm 2005). Most notably for parallels to pandemic policy, the Manhattan Project simultaneously pursued multiple research paths into nuclear fission and weapons development, dropping entire avenues of inquiry and increasing other labs’ funding and staff as results emerged. And from the time of Einstein’s letter in 1939 to the dropping of two atomic bombs on Japan in 1945, less than 6 years elapsed (see Bibliography: Schwartz 1998; Gosling 1999). And, they say, it is urgent that such an effort be established soon, because there is no way of predicting accurately when a pandemic might arrive. If it arrives soon rather than later, the lack of vaccine in most of the world will create a divide between haves and have-nots that could corrupt international relations long after the pandemic ends. “I feel as a scientist that we could make progress more rapidly if we sat down in advance and came up with a big-picture strategy and then funded it,” said Dr. Gregory Poland, director of the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minn. “We have neither a process for rapidly developing new vaccines nor a track record” (see Bibliography: Poland 2007). Redefining the problemThose calling for a Manhattan Project–like effort say that what is needed is much broader than what NIAID or all of NIH could deliver. It requires active coordination among all the federal health agencies along with cooperation from congressional funders, plus parallel efforts in other countries. “Pandemic vaccine development has been viewed primarily as a vaccine problem that should be addressed with better science,” Fedson said, “but fundamentally it is a global public health problem that requires better management” (see Bibliography: Fedson and Dunnill 2007: From scarcity to abundance). The Manhattan Project and the nuclear bombs that resulted from it are a sensitive subject to raise in a health crisis that demands international cooperation—particularly a health crisis centered in Asia, where the bombs were used. It is possible that failing to achieve a pandemic vaccine when it is needed—or even failing to confront in advance the possibility that supplies will fall short—could fracture international pandemic preparations just when cooperation will be essential. Nov 2, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Although money for pandemic influenza vaccine research has begun to flow and results have picked up speed, there is widespread frustration that it all took so long. The long standoff with the Indonesian government over sharing of H5N1 isolates has provided a foretaste of the disruption such resentment could cause. The health ministry of Indonesia—the country that has experienced the most human cases and deaths from H5N1 flu—stopped sending isolates to World Health Organization (WHO) collaborating laboratories in late 2006. Those laboratories both analyze the isolates to track the evolution of seasonal and novel flu strains and use them to develop pandemic vaccine candidates; Indonesia’s decision to stop contributing was apparently triggered by the realization that it could never afford to purchase vaccines made from isolates it provided. Part 1: Flu research: a legacy of neglectPart 2: Vaccine production capacity falls far shortPart 3: H5N1 poses major immunologic challengesPart 4: The promise and problems of adjuvantsPart 5: What role for prepandemic vaccination?Part 6: Looking to novel vaccine technologies Part 7: Time for a vaccine ‘Manhattan Project’?Bibliography Further, the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy group Trust for America’s Health recommended in October 2006 that governments create a “multinational pandemic vaccine research and development master program” (see Bibliography: Trust for America’s Health 2006), and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) echoed that call in January 2007, recommending an appropriation of $2.8 billion in such a project’s first year (see Bibliography: IDSA 2007). “At this point, when a pandemic happens, vaccines are going to provide some benefit to a very limited number of people,” Osterholm said. “But they are also going to create a major diversion of activity and energy when the decisions have to be made about who gets what limited vaccine exists. I worry that their negative impact will outweigh their positive impact: They will cause a crisis of leadership around the world” (see Bibliography: Osterholm 2007). last_img read more