first_imgToday, the Baltimore-based funk act Pigeons Playing Ping Pong hits The Peach Music Festival in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Their performance at Peach comes ahead of a busy weekend for the group, with the band making their way to Colorado for a sold-out show with Twiddle at the Boulder Theatre tomorrow, on Saturday night. However, that’s not all the group has in store for the weekend, as Pigeons just announced that they’ll be giving Colorado some extra love with the announcement of a surprise show on Sunday night. Dubbed “An Intimate Evening With Pigeons Playing Ping Pong,” the group will hit the intimate Globe Hall in Denver for two funk-fueled sets to finish off their weekend with a bang. Doors are 8 pm, and this show is set up to be a sell-out so snag your tickets here before they’re gone![Photo: Daniel Ojeda]last_img read more


first_imgAthens, GA-based rockers Perpetual Groove will perform a proper two-night headlining run at Brooklyn Bowl on September 8th and 9th. Since the group came off a two year hiatus back in mid-2015, Brock Butler (guitar, vocals), Adam Perry (bass, vocals), Matt McDonald (keys, vocals), and Albert Suttle (drums) have been putting together some of the strongest and most inspiring shows of the band’s now twenty year career. To add to that, P-Groove released the EP Familiar Stare this past August, which witnessed a new chapter of creativity, maturation, and an evolution of sound for the quartet. The future looks very bright for Perpetual Groove.Cleveland, OH funk/hip-hop/reggae acts Tropidelic will support P-Groove at the Brooklyn Bowl on Friday, September 8th, with support from Trae Pierce & the T-Stones and Broccoli Samurai on the 9th. Tickets for September 8th can be purchased here, and September 9th tix here. Enter To Win A Pair Of Tickets To Your Show Of Choice:[cover photo by Jason Koerner Photography]]last_img read more


first_imgThe preliminary sketch of the Trump Administration’s federal budget seeks to eliminate nineteen federal agencies — groups ranging from the National Endowment for the Arts to the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.Among these potentially defunded agencies is the Appalachian Regional Commission, an interstate and bipartisan collaboration that has funded infrastructure projects, economic development, and community health initiatives for decades. The agency has invested 3.8 billion dollars in the Appalachian region since its inception in 1965 as part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.”Though poverty rates in Appalachian counties have generally improved over the last fifty years, the region is still home to some of the poorest communities in the country. As the coal industry shrivels due to the advent of cheap natural gas, new pollution regulations, and the automation of mining, job opportunities in rural Appalachian towns are few and far between.Historically, most of the Appalachian Regional Commission’s funding has gone to road building and broadband infrastructure projects. In recent years, the agency has shifted its efforts to supporting economic diversification and growth — hoping to fill the hollow void of post-coal Appalachia.In West Virginia, the Appalachian Regional Commission funds the Coalfield Development Corporation, an organization that offers workforce training programs for low-income residents. In 2016, the initiative trained 550 participants in solar installation, construction, and agriculture — each receiving a professional certification or associate degree.Coalfield Development Corporation participant works on solar installation.In 2016, the agency awarded Friends of Southwest Virginia with a large grant for their project: Building Appalachian Spring: Growing the Economy of Southwest Virginia. The project aims to diversify the region’s rural economies by investing in the outdoor recreation industry. Funds will be used to build a Gateway Center to the High Knob Recreation Area, develop four new access points to the New River, create a new trail system, and construct an Appalachian Trail Center in downtown Damascus. Over the next five years the project hopes to create 60 new businesses, 200 new jobs, and increase travel expenditures in the region by $30 million.In Eastern Kentucky, the Appalachian Regional Commission is partnering with TechHire to help the region adapt to an increasingly technological world. TechHire pays participants to learn coding and guarantees a full-time job upon successful completion of a paid internship.Because most rural communities have limited access to financial capital, the Appalachian Regional Commission takes on the important role of investor. The agency’s financial fortitude gets new projects off the ground, leveraging other sources of funding for Appalachian communities further down the road.The Trump Administration’s proposed budget would also eliminate the Economic Development Administration, an agency within the Commerce Department, that provides grants and technical assistance to economically distressed communities. The agency devoted a large sum of funds to coal-impacted communities throughout the Obama Administration.The Appalachian Regional Commission is a politically popular program championed by Democrats and Republicans alike; the agency’s projected elimination has sparked resistance — particularly among the region’s legislators.Representative Hal Rogers (R-Ky), who helped double the Appalachian Regional Commission’s budget as chair of the House Appropriations Committee from 2011-2016, called Trump’s proposed cuts “draconian, careless, and counterproductive.”“We are not going to allow any cuts to the Appalachian Regional Commission,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky). “It is very important to Eastern Kentucky. It has been for a number of years. That’s not going to happen.”Instead of focusing on economic diversification in coal country, Trump is focusing on repealing environmental legislation like Obama’s Clean Power Plan and the Stream Protection Rule (a regulation that keeps coal companies from dumping mining waste into waterways) in hopes of revitalizing the industry. Yet the Trump Administration has also promised to expand fracking — the coal industry’s biggest threat. With cheap natural gas at the nation’s disposal, it is doubtful that the coal industry will ever make a rebound.Trump was supported in mass by blue-collar Appalachian voters on election day after repeatedly pledging to revitalize coal country throughout his campaign. The elimination of the Appalachian Regional Commission would do just the opposite.last_img read more