first_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Min Kahng is the composer and writer of the award-winning “The Four Immigrants: An American Musical Manga,” which he based on the autobiographical comic by Japanese artist Henry Kiyama. Kahng will lead a master class for students on a three-day visit to Harvard as part of the Office for the Arts’ Learning From Performers program.In addition to leading a workshop, Kahng will deliver a public lecture at Houghton Library on Wednesday at 6 p.m. in connection with its exhibition on “Treading the Borders: Immigration and the American Stage.” In advance of his visit, he talked with the Gazette about his creative process and artistic journey.Q&AMin KahngGAZETTE: “The Four Immigrants” was originally a Japanese manga. How did you come to bring it to the stage?KAHNG: I stumbled upon it in a used bookstore in downtown Berkeley (California). Henry Kiyama was a 20th-century Japanese artist who came to the U.S. to study art. He was college-age in San Francisco when immigration laws were stiffened. It primarily interested me because the narrative we are told about Asian immigrant history is they came here to become laborers. To learn there was a Japanese immigrant who came to study art at the San Francisco Art Institute really spoke to me because I feel like I’m trying to carve a similar path. I got in touch with the English translator Frederik Schodt, who I discovered lives 20 minutes away. Fred is a very generous and giving person. He gave me his vote of confidence, and through him I got the blessing of Kiyama’s daughter and granddaughter, who are in Japan. “My parents knew I had a creative side, but they didn’t know how to cultivate it.”,GAZETTE: So was your path to the arts non-linear?KAHNG: I was not involved in theater growing up. I listened to cast albums of Broadway shows, and the Disney renaissance happened when I was in elementary/middle school. But I grew up in a household where the arts weren’t necessarily encouraged. My parents knew I had a creative side, but they didn’t know how to cultivate it. They didn’t know there were theater programs and classes. I think that was fairly common in immigrant families. It may be changing now, but in the ’80s the focuses for immigrant parents were on the classic doctor/lawyer goals. It was definitely a struggle when I decided to major in music — how would I sustain myself, what kind of career would I have? — so I double-majored in rhetoric. It was a way to say to my parents I might become a lawyer.GAZETTE: You mentioned Disney as an influence. Which movie was most powerful?KAHNG: The film that really grabbed my attention was “Beauty and the Beast.” I think the opening number showed me how a single song could set up an entire movie. In that first song, you learn all you need to learn about Belle, and you hear it from a range of townspeople. The way their voices are interwoven, and then Gaston too — by the end of the song, you’re ready to see what happens next. “Optimism” from “The Four Immigrants: An American Musical Manga — Original Cast Album,” courtesy of Min Kahngcenter_img GAZETTE: Back to your education: When you graduated college with your music degree, you went into marketing. Were you trying to take the more expected path?KAHNG: After college, I felt fairly confused as far as what I felt I needed to do. I had not ever seriously considered a career in the arts. Also, the low presence of Asian Americans in media reinforced that; it didn’t seem there were a lot of us working in theater or film or television. When I finally decided to go for it, I used voice lessons as my stable job and took on a whole bunch of other gigs. I was performing community theater, music directing, playing in orchestra pits, and eventually teaching theater classes. Along the way, I was also writing. I had a passion project called “The Song of the Nightingale” (based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairytale).GAZETTE: On your blog, you talk about a trip to New York to network theater connections and how you dreaded having to “schmooze.” Was it as bad as you expected?KAHNG: That trip gave me hope that even if I become more integrated in the New York theater community at every level and in every pocket, there are donors, producers, actors, and musicians who just love making theater. Some might be all about the business and tough to deal with, but the majority of my interactions were pleasant. I’m learning to stop using the word “schmoozing” and instead think about it as connecting with people who are like-minded. I think they are out there.GAZETTE: What are your next projects?KAHNG: My next production is called “Gold: The Midas Musical,” which opens in February at Bay Area Children’s Theatre. It’s an imaginative romp through the Midas story as if imagined by a 10-year-old living today, combining anachronisms like a telescope and wristwatch with contemporary musical theater song styles. I hope to truly focus in on the relationship between King Midas and his daughter, and how they both discover that family is worth more than all the gold in the world. I’ve also been developing a play called “Calafia: A Reimagining.” It’s a portion of an epic story written in the 16th century about a black Amazonian warrior queen who rules over an island of black Amazonian women. It’s believed to be how we got our state name. I’m reimagining her because in the original story she ends up converting to Christianity and getting married — the opposite of everything I found fascinating about this character. My take is focused on the island itself, and addresses themes of how we deal with outsiders in our community.GAZETTE: Is it harder to think of yourself as an artist or a businessperson?KAHNG: I’ll have to say it’s harder to declare myself an artist. I’ve always had a very practical side of my brain, so while some other artists might struggle with the business side of things, I’m pretty adept at it. Having had a corporate job helped me to understand professional dynamics. But because of my path, not thinking art was a career option, it took me a while to have the confidence to say that’s what I am. I’m definitely there now.last_img read more


first_imgDo you want experience working at Harvard’s longest-running arts festival and get behind the scenes with the arts? The Office for the Arts invites you to be a part of Arts First, on Saturday, May 4, 2019! We are seeking volunteers to help set up, clean up, greet audience members, hand out Arts First guides, and keep performance venues running smoothly. No experience necessary.  Open to everyone! All volunteers get a free Arts First T-shirt.If interested, please fill out this form here.Contact Marin Orlosky Randow, Arts First coordinator, with questions at [email protected]last_img


first_imgJAMESTOWN – Jamestown Police are asking for the public’s help after a former Cricket Wireless employee allegedly stole more than $5,000 in cell phone sales from the company.Investigators believe that the employee sold 28 separate cell phones and kept the money. The employee reportedly accepted the transactions in cash and did not issue a receipt. Police are asking customers who may have purchased a cell phone from Cricket Wireless at the Foote Avenue store between August 2019 and January 2020 to contact investigators.Customers have since lost their service, police said. Additional information will be released once charges are placed against the former employee. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgFortified by a cross-court winner to bring up break point at 3-2, Williams looked poised to seize control, but instead a tame forehand into the net to let Muguruza off the hook. Share on: WhatsApp – Barrage –It was the first of a series of vital escapes for Muguruza, who was matching Venus blow for blow in a series of bruising baseline rallies.Gifted two set point at 4-5, Venus couldn’t deliver the knockout blow and Muguruza over-powered her in a gripping rally to save the first before scrambling out of trouble on the second.Muguruza had the momentum now, her piercing ground-strokes gradually moving Williams into enough awkward areas to land the crucial first break at 5-5.Williams was rattled by Muguruza’s barrage, fatally allowing the Spaniard’s lob to drop in and present her with set points that she gleefully gobbled up.Muguruza was just six when Venus first won Wimbledon and the 23-year-old’s third major final appearance was dwarfed by Williams’ 16 Grand Slam title matches.But in all those finals, only Serena had produced the lethal power and poise Muguruza was showing and suddenly Williams was beginning to look her age.Still reeling from the shock of losing the first set, she served up a limp double fault on break point to hand Muguruza the lead at the start of the second set.Williams was shattered and Muguruza went for the kill so ruthlessly that in the blink of an eye she had broken twice more to take a 5-0 lead.Muguruza had spoken eloquently this week of etching her name onto the Wimbledon honours board alongside Venus, Serena and the other All England Club icons.It took one last blizzard of thunderous winners to ensure her dream would come true.center_img London, United Kingdom | AFP |  Garbine Muguruza stormed to her first Wimbledon title and shattered Venus Williams’ history bid with a majestic 7-5, 6-0 victory in Saturday’s final.Muguruza overwhelmed Williams with a supreme display of power hitting in 77 minutes on Centre Court to become only the second Spanish woman to win Wimbledon.Watched from the Royal Box by King Juan Carlos of Spain, the 23-year-old finally got her hands on the Venus Rosewater Dish two years after losing to the American’s sister Serena in her maiden Wimbledon final.Fittingly, it was Muguruza’s current coach Conchita Martinez who was the first woman to raise the Spanish flag at Wimbledon in 1994 when she defeated Martina Navratilova.“The first set was tough. We both had a lot of chances. I’m glad I took mine,” Muguruza said.“Two years ago I lost in the final against Serena and she told me I would win one day. Here I am. Finally!”Venezuela-born Muguruza’s second Grand Slam title, following her French Open triumph last year, denied Williams, 37, in her attempt to become the oldest Wimbledon champion in the Open era.Back in the Wimbledon final after an eight-year absence, Williams had hoped to clinch a sixth All England Club title, nine years after she last lifted the trophy.Instead, she paid the price for a surprisingly nerve-ridden display that condemned her to a second Grand Slam disappointment this year following her Australian Open final loss against Serena.“Congratulations Garbine. I know how hard you work,” Williams said.“I tried my best to do the things Serena does, but I think there will be other opportunities.”Since winning her maiden Grand Slam title in Paris, Muguruza had endured something of a sophomore slump as her ranking dropped out of the top 10.But she has rediscovered her mojo on grass and will climb to fifth when the new rankings are confirmed next week.Remarkably, of her four tour-level titles, two are now Grand Slams.With persistent drizzle blanketing the All England Club, Williams and Muguruza were competing in the first Wimbledon final to begin under the roof, watched by a sell-out crowd including Hollywood actress Hilary Swank.Twenty years ago, Venus admitted she was a bundle of nerves when she made a losing Wimbledon debut against Magdalena Grzybowska and, in her ninth All England Club final, once again there was anxiety coursing through her error-strewn display.last_img read more


first_imgA Palm Beach Gardens man was arrested Thursday, after his girlfriend’s toddler apparently got a hold of the man’s gun and shot himself.The 3-year-old’s mother told investigators with the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office that she heard a loud bang late Wednesday and ran into the bedroom, where she found the toddler with a bloodied hand while he was standing next to the weapon.Her boyfriend, 21-year-old Juan Gomes Quintero, told investigators he was cleaning the .40-caliber Springfield in his bedroom at the home near West Palm Beach and left it loaded in his nightstand.Investigators concluded the child must have pulled the gun from the drawer and fired a bullet through two of his fingers.They subsequently arrested Gomes Quintero, who has a Palm Beach Gardens address, on charges of culpable negligence, unsafe storage of a firearm and tampering with evidence.A judge ordered that he remain jailed in lieu of $12,000 bail. In addition, he is not allowed to have contact with the child or the child’s mother.The boy’s mother, who works in nursing, told investigators that she carried her son to the bathroom, where she cleaned and wrapped up his fingers.She then took the child to Palms West Hospital, where he was treated and released.The mother later called Gomes Quintero to tell him what happened, as he was not in the home when the incident happened. He allegedly told her that he went to the house and grabbed the gun, along with a mirror that had a bullet hole in it.He said that he threw the mirror behind the home, and then left the gun, his wallet, and two cellphones in the car that he had crashed earlier that day near Haverhill Park.Gomes Quintero said he bought the semi-automatic pistol about a month ago and typically kept it in the bedroom closet.last_img read more


first_img11 May 2020 England Golf Official Statement Tags: Coronavirus The UK Government has today provided clarification on outdoor recreation and rules on social distancing in England.These will affect how golf can be played from Wednesday 13 May and, in particular, the configuration of groupings on a golf course.Under new government rules released today (11 May), the following groupings will be permitted upon resumption of play:Individuals playing golf on their own.Two-balls comprising of individuals from different householdsAt the discretion of the golf club, members of the same household playing in two, three or four-balls.Social distancing rules must be strictly adhered to at all times.Government stipulates: “Government is updating the rules so that, as well as exercise, people can now also spend time outdoors subject to: not meeting up with any more than one person from outside your household; continued compliance with social distancing guidelines to remain two metres (6ft) away from people outside your household; good hand hygiene, particularly with respect to shared surfaces; and those responsible for public places being able to put appropriate measures in place to follow the new COVID-19 Secure guidance. People may exercise outside as many times each day as they wish. “You can only exercise with up to one person from outside your household – this means you should not play team sports, except with members of your own household. People may drive to outdoor open spaces irrespective of distance, so long as they respect social distancing guidance while they are there, because this does not involve contact with people outside your household.”Further clarification is being sought from government relating to the opening of professional shops and driving ranges as well as the carrying out of club fitting and coaching sessions.The following organisations have come together to help golf in the UK during the COVID-19 crisis and, through the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Golf, to work with Government to promote safe golf:The Belfry; the British and International Golf Greenkeepers Association; the British Golf Industry Association; England Golf; the Golf Club Managers’ Association; Golf Ireland; the Golfing Union of Ireland; the Irish Ladies’ Golf Union; IMG; The Professional Golfers’ Association; PING; The R&A; Scottish Golf; Syngenta; the UK Golf Federation; Wales Golf.last_img read more


first_img 10 2. Steve McNulty (Luton Town) – 31 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 10. Danny Ings (Burnley, soon to be Liverpool) – 22 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 4. Arjen Robben (Bayern Munich) – 31 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 9. Diego Costa (Chelsea) – 26 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 8. Gary Taylor-Fletcher (Leicester City) – 34 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… As England Under-21 star Danny Ings joins Liverpool, the club’s fans will be delighted with signing a fresh-faced young player.The only problem is Ings isn’t so fresh-faced, the 22-year-old is heavily tattooed, rugged and sports a thick beard, while his heavily set eyes and wrinkled forehead also contribute to his mature appearance.And he’s not the only football who looks old beyond his years, with several other players seeming like they’ve led a tough life.So talkSPORT takes a look at footballer who look older than they are.Click the right arrow above to scroll through our gallery… 10 10 1. Joseph Minala (Lazio) – 18 years old 10 10 10 10 10 10 5. Jeremy Toulalon (Monaco) – 31 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 3. Jay Spearing (Bolton Wanderers) – 26 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 6. Charlie Adam (Stoke) – 29 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… 10 7. Ronny (Hertha Berlin) – 29 years old – Click right to see more players who look older than they are… last_img read more


first_imgScience says… on second thought, science says the opposite.  Or, we’re not sure what science says.  The following recent stories show that things you thought science had proven may not be true at all.  What’s next?Take testosterone for fairness:  The image of the testosterone-crazed, egotistical, reckless, raging road warrior is all wrong.  At least, that’s British and Swiss researchers found with a controlled experiment on 120 subjects that showed people given testosterone pills were more likely to make fair-minded judgments than those with a placebo – unless they knew they took the testosterone.    The headlines tell all: “Testosterone does not induce aggression, study shows,” from Science Daily and PhysOrg; “Women on testosterone only think they’re macho,” from New Scientist, which added, “Long blamed for aggression, promiscuity and even greed, some of testosterone’s alleged effects may be all in the mind.”  One of the researchers explained the reason for the experiment: “we were interested in the question: what is truth, and what is myth?”Germs do a body good:  Here’s a headline to raise eyebrows from Live Science: “Germs may be good for you.”  Those raised on the image of nasty germs may be surprised at what science is saying now: “Exposing kids to nasty germs might actually toughen them up to diseases as grown-ups, mounting research suggests.”Survival of the… what?:  Oh my goodness, what would Charles Darwin say about this headline from Science Daily and PhysOrg: “Social Scientists Build Case for ‘Survival of the Kindest’.”  Was all that talk about Malthus and nature red in tooth and claw for nothing?  “Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, are challenging long-held beliefs that human beings are wired to be selfish,” the article begins.  “In a wide range of studies, social scientists are amassing a growing body of evidence to show we are evolving to become more compassionate and collaborative in our quest to survive and thrive.”  If only Hitler and Stalin had known.    The authors attempted to give Darwin a reprieve by quoting him as the father of compassion theory: “This new science of altruism and the physiological underpinnings of compassion is finally catching up with Darwin’s observations nearly 130 years ago, that sympathy is our strongest instinct.”  There’s a research project for someone: what did Darwin mean, in context, and in the larger context of his view of how evolution operates?We were going to share the story about the Professor who is receiving messages from space, but that’s just a teaser line on PhysOrg about ground-space communications with the International Space Station.If scientists cannot be sure about things that are testable right in the lab, how can they possibly be so cocky about things that supposedly happened millions of years ago?  Nice sentiment: “what is truth, and what is myth?”(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more