first_imgColoured vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, tomatoes, peppers and mushrooms provide antioxidants so be sure to eat plenty.A pudding could be a fruit crumble with ground nuts and seeds mixed in with the flour topping. A dollop of ice cream or low-fat yoghurt will help replenish glycogen stores. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS If you like brunch, and providing you have three hours to digest it before playing, have protein, such as chicken breast cooked in a tomato sauce with rice, pasta or new potatoes (for slow-release energy). Don’t eat lots of fibrous vegetables before playing, keep these for the post-match meal.Post-match, over a few hours, drink 500ml of water for each ½kg lost. A recovery drink, such as a protein shake (unless under 18), half an hour after the game will start the process of repairing muscles.Two hours later, a good meal is a beef or lamb casserole with potatoes/rice to provide iron and protein to help repair muscles, while the carbohydrates replace lost energy stores.center_img All Blacks post training nutritionEating the right food, particularly pre- and post-match, can help optimise your fitness and reduce recovery times. This is particularly helpful towards the end of the season, when you might have niggling injuries.If you get pre-match nerves, a liquid meal provides valuable nutrients and is more quickly and easily digested than solids.For breakfast, porridge with milk and brightly coloured fruit provides slow-release energy. Alternatively, have muesli with fresh fruit and plain bio yoghurt, followed by two pieces of wholegrain toast with a scrape of butter and peanut butter, fruit spread or Marmite.Then a couple of hours before the game mix 25g porridge oats, 500ml semi- or skimmed milk, half a banana, a dessertspoon of ground almonds and a teaspoon of honey into a blender. Some people like to add a scoop of protein powder, but if you’re under 18, I don’t recommend it.For those who can stomach a good breakfast, have beans, grilled tomatoes, eggs – two poached or an omelette with four egg whites – followed by muesli (above).last_img read more


first_imgScott Williams had a very effective game against the Pumas. He was the games’ joint highest for clean-breaks (two) and beat more defenders than any player on the field (five). His defence was rock solid as ever. But whilst his individual performance was noteworthy,  it was his team contribution that made such a difference. Williams’ ability to throw an accurate 15 yard pass off both hands added a new dimension to Wales’ backline and Williams executed 12 passes compared to his opposite number who threw just two.Together with Dan Biggar, who also distributed accurately, Williams regularly fed the ball into the wider channels. The accuracy and speed of passing meant that Cory Allen, George North, Leigh Halfpenny and Liam Williams all managed to carry the ball more than 57m each. Warren Gatland has been looking for ‘Plan B’ for a while – he may need to rename it ‘Plan SW’.Smacked: Wales only missed three tackles in the second halfMissed tackles or too keen on the kick charge?Wales missed 12 tackles in the first half against Argentina – they only missed eight in 80 minutes against the Boks.However, it was clear that most of the misses were as a result of being overly keen to charge down clearance kicks. Rushing up too quickly made Wales susceptible to a side step, as they found to their cost on numerous occasions in the first half. As a rule Argentina kick a lot of ball from the ten channel and it was obvious that Wales were trying to pressurise their clearances. In fact, most of the missed tackles came from front row forwards who occupy the first and second guard positions in Wales’ ruck defence and who regularly find themselves having to pressurise clearance kicks. Nevertheless, the overly aggressive kick charge was rectified at half-time and Wales only missed three tackles in the second half.Leigh Halfpenny can kick in any conditions LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leigh Halfpenny is a tremendous goal kicker; arguably the best that Wales has had. However, Saturday’s display was exemplary when you consider the condition of the surface at the Millennium Stadium. It was like playing on humus covered in watercress. Yet Halfpenny still only missed one goal kick. He was eight from nine at 89%. That is a remarkable return when you consider how unstable his footing would have been.The WRU should seriously consider laying a 4G surface in the Millennium Stadium. Either that or boot manufacturers are going to have to manufacture ‘rugby crampons’ specifically designed for the Welsh squad. Skipping by: George North and several team-mates found proceedings fairly easy during their game against ArgentinaBy Paul Williams12 months is a long timeWales beat Argentina by 40 – 6 in an enormously comfortable victory – a pleasant contrast to last year’s fixture which the Pumas won by 26 – 12. The result was even more impressive when you consider that Wales had new combinations in the front row and centres, plus backrow and back-three combinations with limited game time.Surprisingly, Wales’ possession and territory stats were meagre when compared to the Springbok encounter – Wales secured 44% possession and 46% territory. However the use of that possession was, at times, a delight to watch. Mike Phillips regularly ran a direct ‘arc’ across the tackle line, sucking in defenders and leaving gaps into which Wales consistently sent their principal ball carriers. Toby Faletau, Scott Williams and George North were the main beneficiaries of Phillips’ running lines and in fact North added at least another minute to his show reel.Dan Biggar’s passing and tactical kicking was as calm and assured as Cory Allen’s debut. But the positives weren’t limited to the backline. The lineout ran at 92.9% and the scrum was stable, even with two debutant tight-heads. Playing both Sam Warburton and Justin Tipuric increased Wales’ ruck speed and the ruck defence was tight  even when down to 14 men. There will be those who believe that the Pumas have regressed over the past 12 months and they may be right. However, this is also the same Pumas team that remained largely competitive in this year’s Rugby Championship. Gatland will be pleased.Hibbard. Immense.The Montana Mountain goats of North America, when fighting, crash heads with such force that it causes their hooves to fall off – even they’d think twice before running into Richard Hibbard.MOTM: Faletau won the bubbly, but Hibbard ran him closeHis performance against Argentina was outstanding and more than justified his inclusion in the IRPA’s shortlist for team of the year. Not once did Hibbard go backwards in the tackle, even when triple tackled. But whilst his carrying was abrasive it was his tackling that caught the eye. It literally caught the eye of the Argentinian outside half, who having spotted Hibbard in his channel fumbled a pass which led directly to Mike Phillip’s try. It’s a shame that modern hookers are replaced after 55-60 minutes as it limits their ability to win man of the match awards. If Hibbard had made it past 70 minutes he would have run Toby Faletau very close for the bottle of bubbly.Scott Williams opens the backline Argentina’s Pablo Matera (L) is tackled by Wales’ Toby Faletau during the international rugby union test match between Wales and Argentina at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, south Wales on November 16, 2013. AFP PHOTO / PAUL ELLIS — RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE (Photo credit should read PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images) last_img read more


first_imgSome team’s lineouts go off like clockwork, with star forwards fitting into the right space at the right time, withe the calls perfectly understood. You see Ireland doing this brilliantly, with Paul O’Connell‘s troops knowing precisely where they must go.However, if you get there as part of this wonderful ballet, but cannot lift well, all the hard work and planning will be for nothing. You cannot ignore the importance of nailing your lineout lift. It must be dynamic, quick, stable and able to boost a jumper high. So we thought we’d help you with this, giving you three exercises to do in the gym that will help you achieve your lifting goals come set-piece time. Follow these exercises and you should see your boosting improve. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The lads are Performance Pro gym in London take some time out to show you how to work on your goblet squat, thrusters and wallball throws. Have a gander and try it yourself. Hopefully these exercises can help you realise your potential in your lineouts.And if you want to share your gym experiences with us, get in touch via Twitter – @Rugbyworldmag – or on Facebook – Rugby World Magazine. Good luck!last_img read more


first_img Beauden Barrett’s brother no longerMarch has seen Beauden Barrett’s brother go through a defining stage in his career. Not as important as the one where he will inevitably become an All Black, but important none the less. The point where his performances have reached such a level that he has ceased being referred to in relation to his brother, Beauden, and is now known as Jordie. In any other rugby nation, Jordie’s performances at fullback for the Hurricanes this season would have been regarded as worthy of a test call up.Making an impression: Jordie Barrett is stepping out his big brother’s shadowHowever, as a fullback in New Zealand your performances need to be better than that of Ben Smith, Israel Dagg and Damian McKenzie. The reality is that his long-term position probably isn’t at fullback, but at 12. At 6ft 5inches tall and already 15 and a half stone at the age of twenty, Barrett is built like a home. He is genuinely a triple threat, with a run, pass and kick game that had already shredded some very senior reputations in Super Rugby. He is also a test standard goal kicker – better than Beauden – which is a rare chink in the current All Blacks’ setup. Well played Jordie.The dilution of Australian rugbyAustralian rugby is at a low point. Probably the lowest point since the game turned professional. An over-expansion of their Super Rugby franchises, added to the migration of their talent pool to the UK and France, has left Australian rugby diluted to the point that of rugby homeopathy – and is just as ineffective. After five rounds of Super Rugby only one of the five Australian franchises has a positive points difference – the Brumbies at plus ten.Tough questions: The five Australian Super Rugby franchises are strugglingBetween them the Brumbies, Rebels, Waratahs, Reds and Force have a points difference of -244. The Kiwi five have +245 points. There simply isn’t the money, player or supporter depth in Australian rugby to maintain their current structure. The hard truth is that one franchise needs to go and if Aussie rugby is really honest with itself, two need to be deleted.Newport RFC have a big decision to makeIf when, in the womb, you were given the option of being born a supporter of any rugby team in the world, Newport Gwent Dragons or Newport RFC wouldn’t be the first name on most babies’ lips. Years of underfunding and political turmoil in Welsh rugby has left the region in a dreadful state of disrepair. March saw the burden of Newport’s rugby supporters increase further. With the Welsh Rugby Union stepping into save professional rugby in the region, by increasing their stake from 50% to 100%, the future of rugby in the whole of Gwent rests on the shoulders of Newport RFC. The situation is complex – it’s always thus in Welsh rugby.Under-funded: Professional rugby in Gwent is at a crossroadsIf professional rugby is to continue in the region, the WRU, as part of the buyout, want control of Rodney Parade – which belongs to the amateur team Newport RFC. In short, Newport RFC must give up its assets to save regional rugby for the whole of the Gwent region. Many have viewed the WRU’s actions with suspicion, which is unfair. The union is doing everything it can to save pro rugby in the region. The easiest option for the union would be to shut the region entirely, write off the loss and adequately fund the remaining three regions. The decisions that need to made in the coming months are complicated, but without making them the outcome is simple – professional rugby in East Wales will cease to exist. The emergence or Jordie Barrett, professional rugby in Gwent’s survival, a Parisien mess and Jonah Lomu rugby are all covered in this monthly round-up Racing 92 and Stade Francais -chaosRacing 92’s proposed merger with Stade Francais will surely go down as one of the worst, if not the worst, pieces of rugby administration ever witnessed. The last time rugby witnessed such poor handling was when Mauro Bergamasco played scrum half. It’s not that the decision to merge is incorrect, there is sound financial reasoning for the bringing together of Paris’ leading clubs. But to announce it to your players, supporters and the wider public in such a cold way was bizarre. In an environment where every team selection, transfer and sacking is leaked days in advance, the concealing of such a dramatic piece of news was remarkable.Shambles: The handling of the proposed Stade Francais-Racing 92 merger was poorIt appeared the decision had been made without any input from the stakeholders. Where were the stakeholder meetings? Where was the debate? Where was the right to reply? It’s rare when the rugby public feels sorry for Top 14 players and their diamond encrusted boots, but to leave two squads of players unaware of their employment status raised a collective eyebrow – especially in a sport where contracts are usually decided long before the end of the season. The merger is now off, at least publicly, but when it re-emerges, which it will, we can only hope that it is handled better.Jonah Lomu Rugby – 20 years oldIt may seem trivial to write about a rugby computer game in a rugby column. To some, sitting lazily in front of a PlayStation 1 is the very antithesis of the dynamic sport that rugby undoubtedly is. But to others, myself included, Jonah Lomu Rugby (JLR) is worthy of a place in rugby’s Hall of Fame. If, like me, your on-field ability was limited, the game gave you the chance to live out your dream and become the player you always wanted to be.Fearsome sight: Jonah Lomu is an icon in world rugbyTo be able to throw the 30 yard pass, launch a 50m line clearance, or live out every young Welshman’s dream of handing-off the entire England team in a rapid-fire burst of L1+R1. Sometimes, the addiction of palming people in the face with Lomu meant that you often wouldn’t take the quickest route to the try line – instead, taking the long way around to once more cruelly batter Mike Catt’s virtual self. All of which was wrapped up in the velvety wit of Bill Mclaren and the now Chairman of World Rugby, Bill Beaumont. In short, a rugby game so good that even after 20 years we are ‘digging like demented moles’ in search of a game that betters JLR’s playability. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS  For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. And to download the digital edition, click herelast_img read more


first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Top prize: Myerscough College celebrate their U19 triumph “For the organisation to have the Portuguese prime minister attend says a lot about the growing popularity of rugby in Portugal.”Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Teams from England, Australia, Ireland and Portugal all triumphed at the age-grade festival in Lisbon. Martin Allerton reportscenter_img In the U15 boys’ section, Blackheath were the cream of the crop and deserved winners, beating Cascais 5-0 in the final, whilst Portuguese team Lusitanas won the U15 girls’ title, beating USA Schools 12-5.The U13 category was arguably the most competitive of the entire tournament, with 32 teams involved. The final was played out between two Portuguese teams, Agronomia beating Direito 15-10, showcasing the quality of youth rugby in Portugal in the face of strong opposition from England, Ireland, Scotland and Spain.Indeed, over the weekend the host sides were competitive in all age groups, which bodes well, particularly in light of the recently agreed initiative with Premiership Rugby to support the development of the game in Portugal.Much to the gratitude of the Portuguese coaches, George Tavner, assistant academy manager and coach development lead at Bath, and RFU coach development officer Andrew Webb were on hand throughout the festival to lend their support.Next year’s Portugal Rugby Youth Festival takes place over the weekend of 4-5 April 2020 and bookings are now being taken. Visit www.portugalrugbyfestival.com for more details.Irish champs: Tullow didn’t concede a point in winning the U17 titleFor Worcester coach Jon Dear the weekend exceeded expectations. He said: “As coaches and parents our role is to give our youngsters a life-long love of rugby. The Portugal Youth Rugby Festival goes a long way to achieving that objective.“It amplifies all that is good about rugby. Brilliant fun, extremely well organised, great standard of play and overall just a fantastic experience for the players. I had to pinch myself at times; I looked round and there’s a girls’ team from Italy playing an American side and on a separate pitch Australian boys against a quality Portuguese side. At the bars you see teams from Sweden next to Belgians, French, Spanish, Qatar and New Zealand.“What more could you want from a tour? Everything was just brilliant from start to finish and we will definitely be back. I’d encourage every team to think about participating at least once. You’ll not regret it. Worldwide winners at Portugal Rugby Youth FestivalThis year’s Portugal Rugby Youth Festival reached new heights with record crowds, 3,000 players representing 115 teams from five continents and the attendance of Portuguese prime minister António Costa as well as World Cup winner Lewis Moody, the 2019 tournament ambassador, courtesy of main sponsors Dove.With ten pitches in use throughout, it was two days of frenetic action at the Estadio Universitario De Lisboa with boys competing at U13, U15, U17 and U19 levels and girls at U15 and U19.U19 boys is the blue-riband event of the largest youth rugby festival in Europe and this year the competition was formidable with strong entries from Australia, England, France, Wales and the USA.VIP Guest: Antonio de Cuhna and Portugal PM Antonio CostaFast, attractive, flowing rugby featured throughout and the final was an all-English affair with Myerscough College emerging 13-0 winners o a closely-contested match against Truro College.Myerscough College coach Matt Garrod said: “We enjoy this tournament, the competition and the first-class organisation and have been supporting it for many years. Coming here to Lisbon is a reward for our lads who have worked hard throughout a long tough season, which started back in August.”Steve Larkins, Rugby Academy Leader for Truro College, could see the positives in defeat: “Of course we wanted to win but I’ve told our boys that they can be very proud of themselves.“They played good rugby throughout and came very close. When you consider that most are only 17, that’s a pretty good achievement. This trip has been a great experience for them, on and off the field and we look forward to returning.”The U19 girls’ section was won by Australian team Melbourne Kangaroos as they beat Portuguese select side Lobinhas 15-14 with the final play of the match.Wizards from Oz: Melbourne Kangaroos won the girls’ U19 competitionAt U17 level, Irish team Tullow RFC were the deserved winners, not even conceding a point across six games and scoring 105. They beat local champions CDUL 7-0 in the final.last_img read more


first_img Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Six Nations TV Coverage 2021: BBC and ITV Matches What Is A Grand Slam?A Grand Slam is when one side wins every game in a single Six Nations Championship – or Five Nations as it used to be.It is an incredible achievement to defeat all of your rivals in the one calendar year. And it is not easy to do. Since 2000, when Italy were invited in to expand the Five Nations into the Six Nations, Wales are the only team to have done it four times. They achieved this in 2005, 2008, 2012 and 2019 with three of those taking place under the stewardship of Warren Gatland.France have won three Grand Slams in the Six Nations – the French achieved this in 2002, 2004 and 2010.Although they have won the most Grand Slams across any era, with 13, England only have two Six Nations Grand Slams to their name, with a clean sweep in 2003 and then in 2016.Ireland have two Six Nations Grand Slams to their credit, which was achieved in 2009 and in 2018. However, Scotland have not won a Grand Slam since the tournament expanded to welcome in the Italians – who have never won a Grand Slam. Take a look at what games are being… Expand The greatest honour a team can achieve in the Six Nations, we explain what the term ‘Grand Slam’ means. As things stand right now France and Ireland are the only two teams who could complete the honour after winning the opening two matches of their campaigns. Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Collapse Six Nations TV Coverage 2021: BBC and ITV Matches Who is leading the way in the Six… With the moving on of Warren Gatland (three) and Joe Schmidt (one) from Ireland, Eddie Jones (one) is the only current Six Nations head-coach left who has led his side to victory.Current French coach Fabien Galthie knows what it takes to win a Grand Slam though as he won several of them as a player with France. He won two Five Nations Grand Slams in 1997 and 1998 before securing a Six Nations Grand Slam in 2002. Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Six Nations Table 2021 Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Six Nations Table 2021 Power and Glory: Wales winning the Grand Slam in 2019 (Getty Images) last_img read more


first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments (15) Melanie Barbarito says: June 1, 2012 at 6:44 am Is wonderful correspondance and sometimes a Priest need to shows the love of God while he is Fighting his own battles and through his wiliness to serve God and God’s children. Help those who are in need without looking at race, color or religious beliefs, which is the true calling of our Lord Jesus. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Vivian Varela says: May 30, 2012 at 8:57 pm I enjoyed this! Thank you. By Danielle TumminioPosted May 30, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 May 30, 2012 at 10:09 pm This is great! Featured Events June 27, 2012 at 2:30 pm The magic in Danielle Tumminio’s fine article is a METAPHOR, folks. It’s not to be taken literally. Relax. May 31, 2012 at 6:43 pm I have always felt a terrific affinity for Mary Poppins. Ordained to the priesthood late in life I believe Danielle has hit upon an amazing analogy! Thank you! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Roger Phillips says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Gretchen Pickeral says: Submit a Press Release Jeannine Lanigan says: Comments are closed. Connie Clark says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York June 4, 2012 at 8:55 am The daily walk alongside the people of faith seems very little to me like the relationship between Mary Poppins and her charges. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 30, 2012 at 5:13 pm What a wonderful analogy!!! And sometimes a Priest has to be the one to provide the spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down—the spreading of the word of God’s grace sufficient to comfort and strengthen the people facing life as it is with all its trials and pains. Bill Minkler says: August 7, 2012 at 1:59 pm “They listen to the anguish of . . . of parents who lost children, of those . . . who are hopeless or . . . sorrowful . . . They hold all those experiences in their hearts, all the while believing and teaching the hope Jesus offers: that suffering never has the final word; that death is not more powerful than love; that those broken kites will fly again . . .” When our infant daughter died (and we lost 6 more babies through miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy), our church – clergy and congregation alike – provided little if any acknowledgement, support, or validation. There were a very few people who were brief exceptions to this, but our grief was treated primarily as a distasteful event to be ignored. We were actually told that recording the death among the quarterly parish demographics constituted an announcement to the parish. We tried to encourage a more enlightened, more humane ministry for all hurting people, particularly the bereaved (most especially those like us with “disenfranchised grief”). Our pleas were rebuffed, and we reluctantly left this parish, and ultimately, Christendom altogether. Because sometimes death IS more powerful than love – conditional love that is too squeamish or uncomfortable to encompass suffering people. The anguish of being a bereaved parent and involuntarily childless is excruciating, but the collateral damage of our church turning its back on us made the injury so much worse. My kite is permanently broken, and it will never fly again. May 31, 2012 at 7:03 pm Very moving and well done. I would love to attend her lectures at Yale or where ever. Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing May 30, 2012 at 9:37 pm And I am happy and blessed to say (even if I say so myself) that I have been fortunate to have priests just like Rev. Tumminio who have welcomed and nurtured me as I have grown to be a member of the Episcopal Church. What a beautiful essay. Thank you priests, deacons, and lay members for doing your best for us every day.I think it is time to pop the DVD in the player this evening and watch with a unique and special perspective. Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS June 5, 2012 at 4:14 pm Amen! Linda. The article is well written – but there is nothing magical about orders. Grace is a mystery; magic – is – well, magic: smoke and mirrors. Rev.David Rodriguez says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Susan Allen says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Linda McMillan says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA ‘A priest is like Mary Poppins’ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Danielle Tumminio[Episcopal News Service] The other day, someone asked me what a priest does.“Do you officiate weddings and funerals every day?” she asked. “Or pray all the time? What exactly is it that you do?”It’s a common question from churchgoers and non-churched folk alike: What is this work to which a priest is called?Initially, I responded to my friend with a laundry list of priestly responsibilities, but about somewhere between, “Baptize newcomers,” and “Dredge the church basement if it leaks,” her eyes glazed over. Then it came to me, the perfect metaphor for who a priest is and what a priest does.“A priest is like Mary Poppins,” I said, and then I explained what I meant.At the beginning of Mary Poppins, Mr. and Mrs. Banks lose the last in a string of nannies unable to control their children, Jane and Michael. Mr. Banks pens a list of characteristics needed in a caretaker—ordered, disciplined, rule-abiding—while his children want someone who will “love us like a son and daughter, and never smell of barley water.”George Banks rips the children’s list up and throws it into the fireplace, where its shredded pieces ascend to the sky and reach the hands of Mary Poppins, who literally blows the other potential nannies away in order to get the job.Priests do the same thing: They listen for the messages discarded in the fireplaces of our lives. They listen for what’s not said and seek overlooked opportunities for growth. Then they issue a call for that growth, though their people might be surprised to hear it. In that way, like Mary Poppins, they are prophetic voices, speaking with a vision that might seem unexpected.As the plot develops, Mary Poppins takes the children on a series of magical journeys: They snap their fingers to clean up, jump into a street drawing for an adventure with penguins, and drink tea while floating in midair. Each fantastical event presses against Jane’s and Michael’s way of being in the world, not so much because of magic as because Jane and Michael discovered lessons they need to know.This is the second thing priests do. Guided by the Holy Spirit, they create opportunities where transformation occurs: in the Church’s liturgy, in the sacraments, in educational and mission programs. In those spaces, all of God’s children can discover something new about their relationship to Jesus and how they can help create a world without pain and suffering.Then the plot thickens. Mr. Banks treasures his work responsibilities above spending time with his children—who desperately want to fly a kite with him—so Mary Poppins convinces him to take his children to work. On the way, Michael tries to give his money to the bird lady who sits on the steps of St. Paul’s rather than invest it in the bank where his father works, making such a fuss that Mr. Banks loses his job. But at his lowest moment, mortified by his job loss, humiliated in front of his colleagues, this father finds himself thinking the way Mary Poppins does. He begins to laugh, and in that laughter, finds healing.So at the end of the film, George Banks comes home shamed by his colleagues but with a mended kite in his hand. His priorities restored, he takes his children to the park, where they fly that kite together, finally united as a family.In that image, one discovers the third thing priests do: They watch as the kites of people’s lives break, seemingly beyond repair. They listen to the anguish of husbands whose wives died too young, of parents who lost children, of those with addictions, who are hopeless or homeless, sorrowful or sick. They hold all those experiences in their hearts, all the while believing and teaching the hope Jesus offers: that suffering never has the final word; that death is not more powerful than love; that those broken kites will fly again. And by doing this work in God’s name, their ministry becomes about the divine, not about themselves.As the story of the Banks family concludes, Mary Poppins remains apart from them, standing on the doorstep with her carpetbag in hand, and the parrot on her umbrella speaks:“That’s gratitude for you, didn’t even say goodbye,” he says.“No, they didn’t,” she says.“Look at them,” he says. “You know, they think more of their father than they do of you.”She smiles. “That’s as it should be.”Then Mary Poppins flies away, her feet in first position, ready for the next ripped-up note that crosses her path. She is once again ready to perform her calling. One can only imagine that she continues to be a conduit through which the visionary and prophetic speak, through which the miraculous can be experienced, and through which the broken are empowered to soar—work that is, curiously enough, the calling of a priest.– The Rev. Danielle Tumminio lectures at Yale University and is the author of God and Harry Potter at Yale. She currently serves as an interim associate at St. Anne in-the-Fields Episcopal Church in Lincoln, Massachusetts.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. George Werner says: Lisa Kirby says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ June 1, 2012 at 9:30 pm Oh brother… Can anybody say “Magical Thinking?” Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Mike Ehmer says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK May 30, 2012 at 6:02 pm A marvelous analogy! There are so many other illustrations from that movie that could also apply. Thank you. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Joanna Depue says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET June 5, 2012 at 3:53 pm I had the same thought as Linda McMillan. Yes, it is a beautifully written piece, but I once told a parishioner that I could not read her mind. In all seriousness she responded, “But you’re supposed to be able to. You went to seminary.” I think I’m a pretty good priest, but I can never be the priest described by Mthr. Tumminio. Johanna Fredrics says: Submit an Event Listing May 31, 2012 at 7:48 am As I reflect on my 50 years of ministry since graduating from Berkeley at Yale, this piece captured so much, so beautifully. Thank you Danielle. Hope our paths cross in October when our class will meet in New Haven…George Werner The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more


first_imgCanada: Overwhelming support for Joint Anglican-Lutheran Commission Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Comments (1) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 8, 2013 at 9:25 am As a long-time confirmed Anglican and Lutheran Franciscan, my heart soars at the prospect of being able to be fully loyal to both my spiritual halves. At the parish level, where established architectural and liturgical styles and theologies can differ significantly, I am less optimistic — but still hopeful that union will come soon. Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rolf Pedersen says: Mary Conliffe, Diocesan Executive Assistant to the Archbishop and a member of JALC speaks to the delegates. Photo: Brian Bukowski[Anglican Journal] Attendees at Joint Assembly rose to their feet in a standing ovation after 98 per cent of delegates voted to support the ongoing work of the Joint Anglican-Lutheran Commission (JALC). The resolution, presented by Richard Leggett of the diocese of New Westminster, read: “That this assembly confirm and support the work of the Joint Anglican-Lutheran Commission and affirm its continued work, with both the size and membership to be determined by each church.”Led by commission co-chairs, Anglican Peter Wall and Lutheran Michael Pryse, the July 4 session featured short presentations from JALC commissioners, including both a Presbyterian and a United Church representative, who confessed to a “twinge of envy” at the success of the Anglican-Lutheran communion.Speakers reminded the audience of the many positive joint initiatives undertaken recently. These include 2011’s cross-border celebration of the first decade of full communion and the signing of the 2001 Waterloo Declaration in Canada and the Called to Common Mission accord in the U.S., as well as ongoing meetings of the four church heads in both countries.Other advances are the Waterloo Ministries Directory, work on shared guidelines for confirmation and baptism, cycles of prayer for full communion, and the full-communion visit to Jerusalem to support Lutherans and Anglicans there who want to enter into a similar partnership. Anglicans have also included Lutheran representatives in their dialogues with the United Church of Canada and the Roman Catholic Church.Presenters told encouraging stories of Waterloo Ministries in action. Pamela Harrington, a Lutheran, told of St. David’s, a thriving Anglican-Lutheran church in Orillia, Ont. Jim Halmarson, a Lutheran pastor, spoke of his work as an Anglican rector at Christ Church in Saskatoon, describing himself now as “fully bilingual” in the vocabulary of both churches. Particularly interesting was the evolution of the joint Lutheran-Anglican parish of St. Stephen and St. Bede, which took its first steps toward communion in the late1960s.The commissioners pointed to JALC’s future commitments. Mark Lewis, a Presbyterian observer, for example, outlined the goal to “support both churches in restructuring and reallocation of resources through the best ways of working together, knowing that together we are stronger than apart, and acknowledging our common affirmation of the 1952 Lund Principle.”Mary Conliffe spoke of the commitment to maintain and strengthen the Waterloo Directory and ensure that it remains a current and comprehensive resource for the church. Gerald Hobbs, of the United Church, called for support for the “model of Fred and Susan” and highlighted JALC’s commitment to encourage and develop joint pastoral letters, study materials and reflections for use in both churches on both sides of the border. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing By Diana SwiftPosted Jul 5, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Ecumenical & Interreligious Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canada Joint Assembly, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more


first_img Submit a Job Listing Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Elections, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Rev. Jorge J. Rivera says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Dimas David Muñoz+ says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Feb 2, 2015 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 5, 2015 at 6:40 am Congratulation to Peter Eaton. He is a great leader. He is the current Dean/Rector of the church I attend here in Denver. St. Johns Cathedral, and during his tenure he has revitalized our cathedral like no other dean had ever done. He will be greatly missed, and honestly many of us wish he had never been elected. As our cathedral will never be the same without him. Bishop Eaton, with all my heart I wish you the best as Bishop, may God Bless you and you will be greatly missed here in Denver. Submit a Press Release [Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida] The Very Rev. Peter Eaton, dean of St. John’s Cathedral in Denver, Colorado, was elected as bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida on Jan. 31, pending the required consents from a majority of bishops with jurisdiction and standing committees of The Episcopal Church.Eaton, 56, was elected during a special convention held at Trinity Cathedral in Miami. He was elected on the fourth ballot out of a field of six nominees. He received 87 votes of 161 cast in the lay order and 72 of 125 cast in the clergy order. An election on that ballot required 82 in the lay order and 63 in the clergy order.“I shall strive every day to be worthy of the trust and confidence that you have placed in me today,” said Eaton following the election. “I am particularly honored to be called to work with Bishop Frade, who, with his wife Diana, enjoys the respect and love not just of the Diocese of Southeast Florida, but of so many in our Church.”A bishop coadjutor is elected to replace the diocesan bishop upon retirement. Frade, diocesan bishop since 2000, will retire in January 2016.Under the canons (III.11.4) of The Episcopal Church, a majority of bishops exercising jurisdiction and diocesan standing committees must consent to Eaton’s ordination as bishop coadjutor within 120 days of receiving notice of the election.Eaton has served as dean at St. John’s Cathedral since 2002. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1982 from King’s College, London, along with an Associate of King’s College in theology. In 1985, he earned a Bachelor of Arts in Theology degree from Queen’s College, Cambridge, and in 1989 a Master of Arts degree. In 1986, he earned a Certificate in Theology from Wescott House Seminary in Cambridge. From 1989-1991, he was a graduate research student in Early Christian history and literature at Magdalen College, Oxford.The other nominees were:• The Rev. Michael J. Battle, 51, interim dean for students and community life, Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts;• The Very Rev. DeDe Duncan-Probe, 52, rector of St. Peter’s in the Woods Episcopal Church in Fairfax  Station, Virginia;• The Rev. John C. N. Hall, 56, rector of St. Boniface Episcopal Church in Sarasota, Florida;• The Rev. Allen F. Robinson, 44, rector of St. James Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Maryland;• The Rev. Canon Martin W. Zlatic, 58, rector of St. Joseph’s Episcopal Church in Boynton Beach, Florida.Pending the required consents, Eaton will be ordained and consecrated as the bishop coadjutor of Southeast Florida on Saturday, May 9 at Trinity Cathedral in Miami.The Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida includes 76 congregations, with approximately 38,000 parishioners, from Key West north to Jensen Beach and west to Clewiston. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN House of Bishops, Jorge Basulto says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR February 4, 2015 at 12:32 am I congratulate Canon Eaton for his election as bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida . Here in St. Johns Cathedral in San Juan, Puerto Rico say ¡Enhorabuena! Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 14, 2015 at 3:54 pm Dear Bishop Eaton, Congratulations. May God bless you always during your Episcopate. Your father and mother would have been proud with these news of your election. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (3) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Southeast Florida diocese elects Peter Eaton as bishop coadjutor People Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more


first_img Comments (1) By Carla Berry Posted Jul 24, 2015 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Province IX An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev.William Muniz says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Latin America, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Third-time trip participant Freya Cantwell and second-time trip participant Axel Steinmetz, building the walls of the house. Photo: Linnet Tse[St. John’s Episcopal Church] For the 10th consecutive year, St. John’s Episcopal Church in Larchmont, New York partnered with Bridges to Community (a non-profit community development organization based in Ossining, New York), to travel to Nicaragua on a building and cultural exchange trip. In the last decade, nearly 100 parishioners and friends have worked side by side with Nicaraguan families to build homes, vented stoves, and classrooms; and to raise funds for the construction of an elementary school in 2011 in honor of Marilyn Pardo, the retired head of the St. John’s Nursery School.Multiple trips to Nicaragua have raised the parish’s awareness of the commonality of issues faced in the developing world, regardless of the hemisphere in which the country is located. Living in the Nicaraguan communities in which they work, volunteers have witnessed unsafe water supplies, poor sanitation, limited access to education beyond elementary school, entrenched poverty, corruption, and lack of economic development and access to health care.Addressing both housing and sanitation issues, a 14-person team from St. John’s returned in early July from a week-long trip after constructing their 24th cinder-block house, and completing a newly inaugurated project, bio-digesters. The volunteers worked in the impoverished Nicaraguan community of Mojon, in the northern coffee-growing region of Jinotega. Nearly 60 percent of Jinotega’s residents live in extreme poverty and for most people, a safe and solid home is only a dream. Reality is a leaky house with a dirt floor cobbled together with scrap lumber, rusted metal and plastic.Trip participants and the beneficiary family celebrating the completion of the house. Photo: Linnet TseThe St. John’s group helped to make a dream come true for Doña Valentina Cruz and her husband, Renee, and their five children and two grandchildren who now have a sturdy earthquake resistant cinder-block home. In addition, the group built two latrine-linked bio-digesters designed to convert human waste into energy (methane gas) that can be used to provide cooking fuel and to make a liquid fertilizer. Perhaps more importantly, it is a sanitary method to dispose of waste in a terrain where it is nearly impossible to dig latrines below the water table.During the week-long trip, volunteers lived in the community in the cinder-block home of a local community leader. Accommodations were dormitory style with food prepared by local cooks, with rice and beans, the local staples, offered as a part of every meal. Volunteers also gathered for a daily “reflection,” a time to consider and share their experience and observations. The reflections are an important part of the Bridges program, as are interactions with the local community, both on and off the worksite.The St. John’s group included a mixture of students and adults, veterans and first-timers, and friends and family members. But the trip was not just about construction. As volunteers worked alongside local masons, beneficiary families, and community members, new friendships were formed. There was time for afternoon soccer games, piggyback rides, art projects with the children, and conversation. Smiles and gestures went a long way towards helping volunteers and locals learn about each other. First time participant, Colin Clay, reflects, “Something that stands out from my week in Nicaragua are the ‘conversations’ I had with Don Renée at the end of the work day.  Neither of us really understood what the other was saying but somehow meaningful communication took place.  With much nodding, smiles, pointing and gestures I think we may have communicated more effectively than a number of conversations that I have had with people that speak English!  The specific content of our conversations may have been lost but not the meaning – that was pretty special.”A highlight of the trip was the fiesta that St. John’s hosted to celebrate their 10 years of commitment to Nicaragua. Over 150 adults and children from the two neighboring communities attended. Pick-up trucks driven by Bridges’ staff stopped for families along the main route to bring them to the party. Ice cream and cupcakes were offered to all, local musicians entertained, an enormous piñata insured great fun, party games were played, and everyone had a wonderful time. The children’s delight was palpable and infectious.It doesn’t take long for first-time volunteers to figure out why Bridges runs these trips. As Cathleen Ketcham expressed, “As a first timer, I am overwhelmed with what we did and just how necessary this kind of work is. I really hope I made a difference!”A veteran of the trip, Harry Sober, shared how profound an impact the trip had on his niece who accompanied him: “The take-aways were very positive: my niece gained a powerful and unique perspective of appreciation for her own current life opportunities and adventures that are provided to her as well as the strong family bond that exists back home. Additionally, she knows that she contributed through dedicated hard work to make a small piece of the world a better place to live.”In the end, Bridges’ goal is for its projects and experiences to be sustainable, not just for the beneficiaries, but for the volunteers as well. To this end, each family beneficiary agrees to pay 20 percent of the cost of the materials for the house through small monthly payments at 0 percent interest over seven years.  Not only does this contribute to a sense of pride in ownership, in addition, the money is paid into a community fund (not to Bridges) for usage to be determined by the community and its leadership. For its volunteers, Bridges hopes that the trip experiences will make a lasting impression and cause participants to think more deeply about cultural connections and humanitarian issues.Linnet Tse, one of the trip organizers for St. John’s, who has been on multiple trips remarked, “We often discuss that we feel we have benefitted more from the experience than we have given. It opens us up to the issues faced in the developing world and engenders admiration for the perseverance and ingenuity of the Nicaraguan people. It’s hard to say good bye at the end of the week, but there is a shared sense of having been part of something special – which is why we keep returning.”— Carla Berry is a member of St. John’s Church, Larchmont, New York. For the last 10 years she has been one of the organizers of the mission trip to Nicaragua. She was a member of the vestry when the decision was made in 2006 to undertake an international mission trip. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed.center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY 10 years building in Nicaragua Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 31, 2015 at 2:23 pm Very commendable for this US Parish to come to Nicaragua and build homes for the poor. I enjoyed reading the article and its accomplishment , but I am curious as to where is the presence or name of the Bishop who appears to be as always in the dark?. Why did you not take a look at the Church of Saint Francis in Managua which used to be a delightful building and is now in ruins, broken windows, and semi abandoned?. Were you able to have an Eucharistic celebration with the diocesan?, or with any of the “clergy”?. All of this is missing in the article and it gives the impression that your group and work was done sideway from the ecclesiastic structure. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more