first_imgROSEAU, Dominica (CMC): Kieran Powell said West Indies were keen to put in a really big effort to win the decisive third and final Test of the current series against Pakistan, starting tomorrow at Windsor Park here. The Windies are eager to prove that their stunning 107-run victory in the second Test which ended last Thursday at Kensington Oval in Barbados was no flash in the pan, as they aim to win their first Test series in four years and over a side ranked higher for the first time in eight years. “The guys are very happy about the performance in Barbados,” Powell told reporters on Sunday following a training session at the match venue. “The bowlers have been very consistent and they have been giving us an opportunity. Now it’s left for us – the batsmen – to put our hands up and put some good totals on the board, particularly in the first innings, so we can be far more competitive.” He added: “It does not happen often, so when West Indies are in town, we the fans should come out and support the team and encourage us to play some good, entertaining cricket. “It’s a Test match, so it would not be hurrah, hurrah. We expect it to be a long, hard graft over five days and we are hoping that we are the side that works harder and gets the positive result.” Powell has returned to the side for the series against the Pakistanis, starting with the preceding one-day internationals, following a three-year, self-imposed exile. Prior his walking away, he had been clearly identified as the other half of the solution to the opening batting problem that had plagued the side. Things have not quite worked according to plan. Though Powell had gotten starts he has failed to carry on and the problem at the top of the order has been compounded by a lack of success for the typically reliable Kraigg Brathwaite. “Returning to the side has not been that difficult,” he said. “If you take a shark out of the water and put it back in, it will swim – so I am swimming. “There are some areas in my batting that I have identified with the batting coach that we are working on. “The video data analyst has provided some footage and we have been examining it. I have also spoken to some people – some former players – so that I can try to rectify it for this match.”last_img read more


first_imgIn 2011, the Carter Center recommended the implementation of campaign financing laws and even prior to that, the Alliance For Change (AFC) was pushing for the implementation of the laws; however, after three years in Government, the party and its coalition partner are yet to make a step in that direction.At a press conference to reflect its third election victory anniversary on Friday, party Chairman Khemraj Ramjattan made another promise to deliver the much-touted piece of legislation.AFC Leader Khemraj RamjattanHe noted that they have begun the campaign to draft the legislation referencing a recent visit by the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association’s General Secretary, Akbar Khan, during which they requested assistance in doing so.“We have started that campaign and I know prior to her passing, Sheila Holder had done a lot of work on that aspect, all that work still remains and we support campaign finance legislation. As again, we have a number of other things and we have to present the legislation now and we have to get the more advanced one from the Commonwealth,” he said.“I have asked for a draft campaign finance legislation (from the Commonwealth). The CPA Secretary General Akbar Khan … met us and indicated where we can get these things, along with source materials for the Consolidated Fund and so on. So, we are going to tap into those resources to come up with a campaign legislation that is modern enough to take care of all the concerns,” Ramjattan added.He reiterated that the party would honour the legacy of Holder. While in Opposition, the AFC had moved a motion in Parliament to set up political financing legislation in 2011.In its final report on the 2011 General Election, the Carter Center said the need to create legislation to cater for campaign financing was important and even reiterated that in its 2015 report.“To ensure realisation of the right and opportunity to be elected, legal reform is necessary to improve campaign finance laws. Legislation should be strengthened to routinely require disclosure of contributions and expenditures. Consideration also should be given to establishing reasonable limits on donations and expenditures to ensure that the free choice of voters is not undermined or the democratic process distorted by disproportionate expenditures on behalf of any candidate or party. A monitoring and enforcement body with oversight authority of compliance with campaign finance regulations would also be a positive contribution to Guyanese politics,” the report stated.Additionally, the report stated that Guyana’s legal framework for elections was silent in the area of registration and operation of political parties; hence, the reason why legislation is needed to establish clear requirements for the registration and operation of political parties that would support the freedom of association and promote broad multi-ethnic parties that could represent citizen interests in governance.Now that the 2018 Local Government Elections are in sight, it is timely to highlight that the Carter Center had recommended in 2015 that the code of conduct for politicians be signed much earlier to include a clear and strong enforcement mechanism.According to the Transparency Institute of Guyana, political financing laws are about protecting the State from corporate and other interests, and ensuring that incumbents avoid corrupt use of State resources and ensure access to resources for all recognised political parties among other issues.last_img read more